Skip to content
Topics
Stories

Despite shows of solidarity, attacks on Asian Americans continue a year after Atlanta massacre

People in this story

(Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
Participants hold a

It’s been one year since a white Georgia man went on a shooting spree at several Atlanta-area massage parlors, killing eight people. Six of the victims were Asian women, representing a significant moment amid a still-ongoing escalation of anti-Asian hatred sweeping the country during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Demonstrations and shows of solidarity spread across the U.S. following the massacre that helped propel the Stop Asian Hate movement, which began in response to a rise in xenophobia and bigotry resulting from pandemic-related political rhetoric, into the national spotlight. 

What’s changed in a year? In the aftermath of the shooting, President Joe Biden signed a federal hate-crimes bill into law designed to improve hate-crime reporting at all levels of government. Awareness about the racial trauma experienced by Asian Americans on a daily basis has increased, but instances of violence don’t appear to be decreasing, Northeastern experts say. In light of several recent attacks on Asian Americans that have garnered media attention, violence remains troublingly pervasive.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

More Stories

Should we be concerned about Google AI being sentient?

06.17.2022

Does TikTok pose ‘data espionage’ concerns for the U.S.? The answer is complicated

06.15.2022

How inflation is influencing the way we think and behave

06.17.22
News@Northeastern