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Spring 2023 registration begins on November 14th, 2022

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website. For curriculum information, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog.

Asian Studies Courses

Crosslisted as HIST 1150

Instructor: Michael Thornton

CRN: 30339

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 1:35-2:40 PM

NUPath: DD, IC

Description: Key course in both the major and the minor. East Asian Studies is a multidisciplinary introduction to the study of China, Korea, Japan, and adjacent regions from antiquity to the present, mainly through historical and literary texts.  The course is taught in English and is open to registered Northeastern University students.

Crosslisted as POLS 3485

Instructor: Dennis Kwok

CRN: 38373

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MW 2:50-4:30 PM

Room: 309 Kariotis Hall

Description: An in-depth study and analysis into modern Chinese history, the current Chinese political and domestic issues, its economy and the geo-political implications for the United States and the rest of the international community. It is a course designed for students who want to gain a more in-depth and practical understanding of China, so that those attending this course may be equipped with the critical knowledge needed to operate effectively in the region, and in their interface and exchange with China and Chinese entities. Ideal for those who intend to work in the China region and related areas.

View the syllabus here

CRN: 39481

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 9:15-10:20 AM

NUPath: DD, IC

Room: Cullinane Building Room 105

Description: Examines the impact of Asian immigrant communities on U.S. political, economic, social, and cultural life and their encounters with racial, political, and economic discrimination from the nineteenth century to the present.

School of Architecture Courses

Instructor: Shuishan Yu

CRN: 34464

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: TF 9:50-11:30 AM

Room: Ryder Hall 264

NUPath: DD, IC, WI

Description: Covers the development of the built environment in China from prehistory to the nineteenth century. Emphasizes technological transformation, structural and stylistic evolvement, cultural exchange, and ideological engagement.

Culture Courses

Instructor: Jennifer Cullen

CRN: 36035

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: TF 1:35-3:15 PM

Room: International Village 014

NUPath: DD, IC

Description: Provides an introduction to Japanese film through works by such great masters as Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Ozu, as well as works by new directors from the 1980s and 1990s such as Tami, Morita, and Suo. Studies both form and content; relates major works to Japanese culture. Conducted in English.

Crosslisted with HIST 1500

Instructor: Michael Thornton

CRN: 36036

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 9:15-10:20 AM

Room: Cargill Hall 097

NUPath: IC, SI

Description: Introduces modern Chinese history and culture through literary works, films, and historical texts. Examines political, social, and cultural changes in China since 1800: the decline of empire; the New Culture Movement of the 1920s; the rise of nationalism and rural revolution; the changing roles of women; the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s; and China’s cinematic, literary, and economic engagement with the world since 1978. Taught in English and open to all undergraduates.

Instructor: Jennifer Cullen

CRN: 30037

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: TF 9:50-11:30 AM

NUPath: DD, IC

Description: Provides an introduction to Japanese popular culture through critical analysis of mass media such as film, television, comics, and animation. Investigates various social and cultural issues, such as gender, family, and education. Films and videos supplement readings. Conducted in English.

History Department Courses

Instructor: Erina Megowan

CRN: 36719

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 9:15-10:20 AM

Room: Behrakis Health Sciences Center 320

NUPath: DD, IC

Description: Focuses on the historical roots of four pressing contemporary issues with global implications. Our world has grown increasingly complex and interconnected, and the planet’s diverse peoples are facing common problems that have tremendous impact on the immediate future. They are (1) globalization, from its origins in the sixteenth century to the present; (2) the potential for global pandemics to alter the course of history, from bubonic plague in the fifth century to H1N1; (3) racial inequality, from religious interpretations in the early modern period to science in the modern era; and (4) gender inequality, from the agricultural revolution forward. For each issue, studies cases and locations spread across the world, examines the links between past and present, and attempts to identify ways forward.

Instructor: Peter Fraunholtz, Michael Purinton

CRN: 31691, 33854

No. of Sections: 2

Days, Time: MWR 1:35-2:40 PM

Room: Behrakis Health Sciences Center 320

NUPath: DD, SI

Description: Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine.

Instructor: Peter Fraunholtz

CRN: 35605

No. of Sections: 1

NUPath: DD, SI, WI

Description: Examines the Cold War, emphasizing how the Soviet-American struggle for global preeminence intersected with decolonization and the rise of the Third World. Uses primary sources, monographs, and scholarly articles to trace the major events and developments of the Cold War & ideological differences between the capitalist and socialist systems, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the construction of the Berlin Wall, the Vietnam War while also exploring how and why the Cold War came to pervade economic, cultural, and social relations globally. Examines how unexpected actors, Cuban doctors and Peace Corps volunteers responded to and shaped superpower rivalry. Considers how the Cold War continues to shape the world today.

International Business Program (D’Amore McKim School of Business)

Instructor: Christopher Robertson

CRN: 38125

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: M 4:35-7:55 PM

Room: Snell Library 039

Description: Presents an introduction to emerging markets, focusing on the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Takes the perspective of U.S. companies and what they must do to be successful in emerging markets. Discusses the differences between doing business in an emerging vs. a domestic market, the opportunities and potential of an emerging market, and the risks of operating in such a market. Then looks at the world from the perspective of emerging markets and discusses steps that their governments, companies, and entrepreneurs must take to succeed in the world economy. Analyzes what emerging markets must do to raise wages and incomes, accelerate wealth creation, and reduce poverty.

Instructor: Ravi Sarathy, Ruth Aguilera, Ravi Ramamurti, Christopher Robertson

CRN: 34844

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MW 2:50-4:30 PM

Room: Snell Library 007

Description: Examines areas of current interest and special topics in the field of international business. May be repeated once.

Philosophy and Religion Department Courses

Instructor: Jung Lee

CRN: 36044

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MW 2:50-4:30 PM

NUPath: DD, ER

Description: Focuses on how traditions imagine the moral life in cross-cultural contexts. Topics may include ideals of human flourishing, notions of virtue and vice, and conceptions of self and community. Offers students an opportunity to learn methods of philosophical analysis and argumentation in cross-cultural contexts.

Instructor: M. Whitney Kelting

CRN: 34824

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 10:30-11:35 AM

Room: Cargill Hall 094

NUPath: ER, IC

Description: Examines Hinduism, Jainism, Theravada Buddhism, Mahayana Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto within South Asia (India) and east Asia (China and Japan). Combines readings in primary source materials (the religious texts of these traditions) with secondary examinations of the historical and doctrinal developments within each tradition and region. This course intends to give students a context in which to examine the ways in which religions develop in interlocking sociocultural and political contexts and to provide a grounding in the lived experiences of these religious traditions.

Instructor: Jung Lee

CRN: 38615

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: T 4:35-7:35 PM

Room: Shillman Hall 210

NUPath: ER, IC

Description: Surveys the origins and development of the indigenous religious traditions of China, from the oracle bone divinations of the Shang Dynasty to the philosophical and religious traditions of Confucianism, Mohism, Yangism, Daoism, and Legalism. Identifies and elucidates those elements of ancient Chinese thought that have had the most lasting influence on the Chinese ethos and worldview. Studies the foundational texts of ancient China and also examines the relevant practices that helped to define the various traditions of thought. Focuses on how religious and philosophical ideas influenced the larger culture of Chinese life in regard to the arts, medicine, the social order, and government.

World Languages Center Courses

Instructor: Vanessa Wei, Qinghong Cai, Linda Chiu

CRN: 37123, 30074, 31063

No. of Sections: 3

Days, Time: MWR 9:15-10:20 AM, 4:35-5:40 PM

Room: Online, Ryder Hall 275, Ryder Hall 273

Description: This course is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Chinese. With its holistic focus on the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, the course helps students build a solid foundation in language form and accuracy, and prepares them to function in a Chinese language environment. Students will learn not only how the Chinese language works grammatically but will also understand how to use Chinese in real life. Some topics include greetings, family, time, setting up an appointment, hobbies, school activities, food, and other interpersonal interactions. Conducted mainly in Mandarin.

Instructor: Qinghong Cai, Vanessa Wei

CRN: 33287, 38259

No. of Sections: 2

Days, Time: MWR 1:35-2:40 PM, R 11:45 AM-1:25 PM

Room: Hastings Hall 102, Ryder Hall 277

Description:This course is designed for students have completed CHNS 1101 or equivalent elsewhere. It aims to foster students’ interest in Chinese language and society, and develop students’ competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational mode of communication through activities that focus on Chinese grammar, vocabulary, and culture. Students will build up confidence in using the language in real-life situations, learn to use the digital tools to become a self-learner. Some topics include school life, shopping, transportation, weather, and dining. Conducted mainly in Mandarin.

Instructor: Qinghong Cai

CRN: 31080

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 10:30-11:35 AM

Room: Ryder Hall 275

Description: This course is designed for those who have already taken the Elementary Chinese 1 and 2 (CHNS 1101, 1102, and their equivalents). It aims to consolidate the foundation that students have built in their elementary Chinese courses, and to develop higher oral proficiency as well as reading and writing skills. Students will learn to handle various tasks such as describing, comparing, and narrating, under the Chinese cultural setting. Some topics are ordering a meal, asking directions, seeing a doctor, renting an apartment, asking for prices, birthday parties, and sports. Conducted mainly in Mandarin.

Instructor:  Hua Dong

CRN: 32867

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 1:35-2:40 PM

Room: Ryder Hall 275

Description: This course is designed to help the learners who have completed the study of elementary Chinese (CHNS 1101, 1102, 2101 and their equivalents) take their abilities to the next level. It will introduce more sophisticated topics relating to language structures and Chinese culture and build a firm foundation for further study. The course will focus on such topics as travel, campus life, Chinese cuisine, and shopping, together with a rich variety of authentic audio/visual material, such as film excerpts, TV series, songs, and reading material. Students will participate in speaking activities to produce and improve pronunciation, intonation and tones in communicative situations, and practice listening and writing skills in meaningful assignments aimed at interacting with the native speakers and their culture. Students will be assessed on their use of the language and the cultural knowledge of the Chinese-speaking countries and regions. Conducted mainly in Mandarin.

Instructor: Vanessa Wei

CRN: 30018

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 4:35-5:40 PM

Room: Ryder Hall 275

NUPath: EX

Description:

This course is designed for students who have completed the study of Intermediate Chinese 2 (CHNS 2102) at Northeastern or the equivalent elsewhere. Topics include shopping standards, course selection, relationships, computers and the internet, and education. The course aims to develop students’ language skills and intercultural competence in order to communicate and interact effectively with local and global Chinese speaking communities. Conducted mainly in Mandarin.

In addition to classroom instruction, the course provides students with the Service-Learning opportunity to choose a community partner and use their language skill to fulfill their service-learning experience.

Instructor: Hua Dong

CRN: 33340

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 4:35-5:40 PM

Room: Ryder 277

NUPath: EX

Description: 

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the Intermediate Chinese sequence or its equivalent and who want to further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students will learn to effectively communicate in written and oral forms on a variety of social and cultural topics in the context of contemporary Chinese society and culture, such as the fast changes in China, women’s status in China, environmental protection, impact of tourism on local culture, Chinese beliefs on food and health, and preparation for a job interview in China. The course places particular emphasis on the ability to describe, narrate, and support an opinion both orally and in written forms as well as deepening the student’s cultural understanding. Students will learn to read more efficiently and rapidly, they will write with greater sophistication and complexity, and speak with greater fluidity. Conducted mainly in Mandarin.

In addition to classroom instruction, the course provides students with the Service-Learning opportunity to choose a community partner and use their language skill to fulfill their service-learning experience.

Instructor: Hua Dong

CRN: 34750

Days, Time: MR 11:45-1:25

Room: Ryder Hall 275

NUPath: EX

Description:

This advanced Chinese language course aims to improve students’ Chinese proficiency and health and food literacy. We examine health and food issues in both local and global communities by exploring various aspects of Chinese philosophy and practices on health and food culture, as well as the findings and recommendations about healthy diets from sustainable food systems by leading scientists and policymakers. We also explore and identify the roles that food plays in sustaining our health, community, and planet, and the challenges being faced. We engage in dialogues and discussions with our peers, community members, and experts to share experiences about the potential impacts of dietary change on health and the environment. Throughout the learning process, we apply the theories, principles, and knowledge in designing innovative solutions. Some themes in the course are Chinese medicinal food tradition, cultural influences on health and food, medical interpreting, planetary health diets, and global and local initiatives in food systems transformation. Students will study issues related to health and food in such genres as narrative, research papers, news reports, and documentary films. Guest speakers such as dietitians and medical interpreters will introduce students to common medical interpreting skills and cross-cultural health issues. You will discuss and analyze food and health-related issues, interview scholars, practitioners, and stakeholders in the local community, acquiring common medical terminology and advanced linguistics skills for professional use, and creating content for publication on a local bilingual newspaper or online platform as part of the Service-Learning requirement.

This course takes on a peer-assisted learning approach by accommodating two groups of students with different linguistic background: Chinese native speakers and advanced Chinese learners. The “one course, two groups” approach will create a partnership between students of different groups to give corrective feedback on grammatical structures and vocabulary during interactions to improve their bilingual accuracy. They will also serve as the “cultural informant” for each other to achieve an authentic and diverse learning environment for cross-cultural communication. Many of the assignments will be small group projects with groups consisting of Chinese learners and native speakers. While it is expected that teammates will work together to complete the assignment, students will be graded individually with different rubrics for Chinese learners and native speakers. Mandarin Chinese is the primary language of communication in this course.

 

Instructor: Rei Inouye, Aya Anderson, Kumiko Tsuji

CRN: 32434, 30034, 31777, 33000

No. of Sections: 4

Days, Time: MWR 9:15-10:20 AM, MWR 1:35-2:40 PM, T 3:25-5:10 PM, MWR 10:30-11:35 AM

Room: Ryder Hall 277

Description: Introduces basic grammar, sentence patterns, and vocabulary of Japanese with emphasis on spoken Japanese. Includes an introduction to the hiragana and katakana syllabaries in the written component. Designed for students with no previous knowledge of Japanese.

Instructor: Aya Anderson

CRN: 30065, 31051

No. of Sections: 2

Days, Time: MWR 9:15-10:20 AM, MWR 1030-11:35 AM

Room: Ryder Hall 277, Ryder Hall 141

Description: Continues JPNS 1101. Emphasizes the development of oral skills; secondary emphasis is on reading. Offers students the opportunity to learn basic grammatical patterns, expand vocabulary, and improve communication skills in modern Japanese. Includes the introduction to kanji characters in the written component.

Instructor: Rei Inouye

CRN: 30064

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: MWR 1:35-2:40 PM

Room: Ryder Hall 265

Description: Emphasizes further vocabulary building. Offers students an opportunity to master the fine points of grammar through written composition, prepared oral reports, and reading and discussion from contemporary Japanese materials.

Instructor: Kumiko Tsuji

CRN: 31450

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: TRF 11:45 AM-1:25 PM

Room: Ryder Hall 141

Description: Builds on JPNS 2101 and focuses on further development of vocabulary. Offers students an opportunity to continue to master grammar and conversation through written composition, prepared oral reports, and reading and discussion from contemporary Japanese materials.

Instructor: Kumiko Tsuji

CRN: 32912

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: F 1:35-3:15 PM

Room: Ryder Hall 277

Description: Continues further development of vocabulary. Offers students an opportunity to continue to master grammar and conversation through advanced reading, composition, grammar review, and listening skills. Whenever possible, offers students an opportunity to engage in local community activities to enhance communication skills and cultural knowledge.

CRN: 31444

No. of Sections: 1

Days, Time: T 9:50-11:30 AM

Room: Ryder Hall 277

Description: Builds on JPNS 3101 and continues further development of vocabulary. Offers students an opportunity to continue to master grammar and conversation through advanced reading, composition, grammar review, and listening skills. Whenever possible, offers students an opportunity to engage in local community activities to enhance communication skills and cultural knowledge.

Courses by Requirement

ASNS 1150 – East Asian Studies

HIST 1215 – Origins of Today: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

HIST 2211 – The World Since 1945

CHNS 1101 – Elementary Chinese 1

CHNS 1102 – Elementary Chinese 2

CHNS 2101 – Intermediate Chinese 1

CHNS 2102 – Intermediate Chinese 2

CHNS 3101 – Advanced Chinese 1

CHNS 3102 – Advanced Chinese 2

CHNS 4800 – ST: Health and Food in Chinese

JPNS 1101 – Elementary Japanese 1

JPNS 1102 – Elementary Japanese 2

JPNS 2101 – Intermediate Japanese 1

JPNS 2102 – Intermediate Japanese 2

JPNS 3101 – Advanced Japanese 1

JPNS 3102 – Advanced Japanese 2

ASNS 2245 – The Asian American Experience

ASNS 3485 (crosslisted as POLS 3485)- China: Governance and Foreign Policy

ARCH 2310 – History of Chinese Architecture

CLTR 1260 – Japanese Film

CLTR 1500 (crosslisted as HIST 1500) – Modern Chinese History and Culture

CLTR 1700 – Intro to Japanese Pop Culture

HIST 3330 – The Global Cold War

INTB 2501 – Competing to Win in Emerging Markets

INTB 4983 – Special Topics in International Business

PHIL 1130 – Comparative Ethics

PHIL 1275 – Hinduism, Buddhism, and Beyond

PHIL 1290 – Chinese Philosophy and Religion