Home » Fall 2020 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2020 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2020

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.

BANNER LISTINGS ARE LIVE AS OF MARCH 16.

First day of Fall 2020 registration: April 6

ENGL by Course Number

Fall 2020

ENGL 1000 English at Northeastern

Instructor: Professor Neal Lerner
Sequence:  W 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

Intended for first-year students in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Introduces first-year students to the liberal arts in general; familiarizes them with their major; helps them develop the academic skills necessary to succeed (analytical ability and critical thinking); provides grounding in the culture and values of the University community; and helps them develop interpersonal skills—in short, familiarizes students with all skills needed to become a successful university student.

ENGL 1120 Trouble in Utopia

Instructor: Professor Marina Leslie
Sequence:  3 – MWR 10:30-11:35
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Comparative
  • NUCore Writing-Intensive in the Major
  • NUPath Exploring Creative Expression & Innovation (EI), Interpreting Culture (IC), Writing-Intensive in the Major (WI)

When the world is on fire and a terrifying variety of previously unthinkable doomsday scenarios seem to be migrating from the pages of science fiction novels to the front pages of newspapers, what is the place of utopia? This seminar will take on that question squarely to explore utopia as a site for literary, political, social, and personal experimentation. Utopia has gotten a bad rap for representing an essentially naïve effort to escape from reality. However, from its origins, utopian narrative has been a multi-disciplinary site for seriously thinking through the theory and practice of radical reform. The most important utopian thinkers have been far from dreamy idealists. For example, two of the most famous Renaissance utopian thinkers, Thomas More and Francis Bacon, were both utopian fabulists and Lord Chancellors of England; and their utopias had real world impacts that neither of them could have imagined. In this class we will read utopian fiction from its classical and early modern origins (Plato, More, Bacon, etc) to contemporary popular culture and science fiction (Italo Calvino, Donna Haraway, Octavia Butler, Neal Stephenson, Ursula K. LeGuin, N.K. Jemisin, etc.), responding to this long and yet discontinuous history with critical and creative exercises. Required assignments: Short in-class writing exercises and Blackboard posts plus two longer projects: For the midterm project, you will identify and critique a contemporary utopian experiment. For the final project, you will produce and analyze your own creative utopian “artifact.” Together we will consider utopia—past, present, and future—in its many forms, as no place, good place, paradox, map, charter, idea, conversation, impossibility, disaster, and hope.

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt
Sequence:  4 – MWR 1:35-2:40
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Foundational or Theories & Methods
  • NUCore Humanities Lvl 1
  • NUPath Interpreting Culture (IC), Understanding Societies & Institutions (SI)
  • Counts as a Theories & Methods req. for the Writing Minor
  • Fulfills a required elective for the Rhetoric Minor

How do we persuade others to change their minds or take action? How do we come to beliefs about ourselves, each other, and the world around us? What is the relationship between language and truth, between knowledge and belief? How do verbal as well as nonverbal symbols–such as images, architecture, clothing, and music–influence what we do, believe, and think we know? This course explores these questions by examining the work of writers who articulate a wide range and diversity of rhetorical theory. We will read theoretical texts with an eye toward applying them in contemporary contexts. Assignments include informal writing, several short papers, and a take-home final.

ENGL/HIST/INSH 1300 Introduction to Health and Humanities

Instructor: Professor Sari Altschuler
Sequence:  A – MR 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

Explores the ways in which narrative and other forms of creative and cultural expression help shape conceptions of illness, healing, and the body. Offers students opportunities to consider the health and humanities through a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives and genres. Includes small-group and class-wide experiential field outings. Culminates in the composition of reflective responses, a medical ethics/medical journalism piece, and a team-based experiential e-portfolio project. Course objectives include differentiating between healing and curing; knowing how to elicit, listen to, and analyze stories to determine how participants in the healthcare system experience illness and healing; being able to articulate the ways health is a cultural construct; and using this analysis to identify an empathic response as a future professional.

ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies

Section 01

Instructor: Professor Kathleen Kelly
Sequence:  B – MW 2:50-4:30

Section 02

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen
Sequence:  D – 9:50-11:30
Attributes:

Offers a foundational course designed for English majors. Introduces the methods and topics of English literary and textual studies, including allied media (e.g., film, graphic narrative). Explores strategies for reading, interpreting, and theorizing about texts; for conducting research; for developing skills in thinking analytically and writing clearly about complex ideas; and for entering into written dialogue with scholarship in the diverse fields that comprise literary studies.

ENGL 1600 Introduction to Shakespeare

Instructor: Professor Erika Boeckeler
Sequence: 3 – MWR 10:30-11:35
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Early Literatures
  • NUCore Humanities Lvl 1
  • NUPath Interpreting Culture (IC), Understanding Societies & Institutions (SI)

An introduction to Shakespeare’s plays in every genre, this course emphasizes questions of language and modes of reading as entryways into key themes and topics (e.g., gender, identity, kin/g/ship, desire) within the Bard’s corpus. An initial in-depth study of the first play will provide a foundational knowledge of rhetorical strategies, considerations of performance, thematic development, and historical context that will then shimmer throughout discussions of the other plays. We will also seek to answer the question: How does Shakespeare help us think through today’s world?

ENGL 1700 Global Literature to 1500

Instructor: Professor Marina Leslie
Sequence: 4 – MWR 1:35-2:40
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Foundational
  • NUCore Humanities Lvl 1
  • NUPath Engaging Difference & Diversity (DD), Interpreting Culture (IC)

The reconsideration of “Global Literature” over that past thirty years or so arises out of a desire to break down barriers that have traditionally kept literatures of the world separate, divided by language, nationalism, geography, and politics. In this course devoted to the study of classical, medieval, and early modern works, we will travel to distant times and across vast geographies to share experiences at once alien and familiar: war, love, vengeance, betrayal, triumph, encompassing the full range of human experience and the height of its artistry. We will read some of the most important and revered texts in the world, whose stories formed and continue to influence a number of enduring literary and cultural traditions. All texts will be in translation, including: the Mesopotamian poem, Gilgamesh, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey; Ferdowsi’s Persian epic Shahnameh; The Irish national epic, Táin Bó Cúailnge; Murasaki Shikibu’s Tale of Genji, Dante Alighieri’s Inferno and Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote. For this introductory survey course, assignments will include regular Blackboard posts, a take-home midterm, a creative/critical assignment that examines the afterlife of the classic texts we are studying together, and an in-class final.

ENGL/AFAM 2296 Early African American Literature

Instructor: Professor Nicole Aljoe
Sequence: E – WF 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s 17th-18th Centuries, Diversity
  • NUCore Comparative Studies of Literature
  • NUPath Engaging Difference & Diversity (DD), Interpreting Culture (IC)

Recent archival research and canon reconsideration has revealed the wealth and variety of texts written by black writers during the 18th and 19th centuries, before the Harlem Renaissance. Drawing on this work, we will investigate the ways in which these early Black writers engaged with a range of issues such as the nature of the individual subject; human rights; gender and class; the rapid expansion of print culture; the development of the novel and other genres; notions of Africa; and of course, notions of freedom and enslavement. Through reading a variety of texts such as: poetry, speeches, essays, letters, fiction, slave narratives, biographies, and autobiographies—we will not only get a sense of the transnational complexity of Early Black literary cultures but also appreciate how these writers created the foundations for various literary traditions across the African Diaspora. Authors may include: Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Frances E.W. Harper, Solomon Northup, Lemuel Haynes, and Pauline Hopkins.

ENGL/ARTE 2301 The Graphic Novel

Instructor: Professor Hillary Chute
Sequence: A – 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

The Graphic Novel explores the word-and-image medium of comics as a narrative form.  It focuses in specific on the contemporary phenomenon of the so-called graphic novel.  What are the preoccupations of today’s graphic novels?  How does their storytelling work? We will read some work in translation, but will largely concentrate on the American tradition, focusing on fiction, memoir, and nonfiction reporting and adaptation.  Throughout, we will attend to practices of reading—and making—comics.  We will pay special attention to the formal language, or grammar, of comics in order to interpret its narrative procedure and possibilities.

ENGL 2440 The Modern Bestseller

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
Sequence: *Cancelled*

Update: this class is no longer being taught in Fall 2020 as of 3/18/20.

ENGL 2510 Horror Fiction

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
Sequence: 3 – MWR 10:30-11:35 AM
Attributes:

This course explores English and American horror fiction from Edgar Allan Poe, Bram Stoker (author of Dracula), to contemporary writers such as Stephen King, Shirley Jackson, Dean Koontz,  Tananarive Due, Neil Gaiman, and Clive Barker. Using short stories, novels, and movies (from adaptations of Dracula to Jordan Peele’s “Get Out”), we will examine the evolution of horror fiction and the various themes, techniques, and uses of the macabre—that is, depictions of the frightening, the gruesome, and death. We will also explore the nature of Evil and the various depictions of it in our readings.

Student writing: announced quizzes, midterm & final take-home essay exams (7-10 pages); optional critical analysis of some horror work not read in the course (7-10 pages).

ENGL 2695 Travel Writing

Section 01

Instructor: Professor Kelly Garneau
Sequence:  Online

Section 02

Instructor: Professor Jon Benda
Sequence: Online
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Comparative or Writing (either/or; cannot count for both)
  • NUPath Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation (EI), Interpreting Culture (IC)
  • Counts as an elective towards the Writing Minor

I’m betting that many of you have a phone full of pictures of places you’ve visited, even for a day. People love taking selfies in front of world-famous places—Stonehenge, Niagara Falls, the Taj Mahal, Mt. Fuji. We take pictures, collect postcards, and buy souvenirs to remind us of the experiences we’ve had across town, across the country, across the world. We are enlarged each time we reach beyond what is known and familiar.

This course is intended to enrich your experiences away from home. You will learn about travel writing and place-based writing by reading examples of the two genres (many about the place where you are), as well as reading what experienced travel writers, critics, and scholars have to say about travel writing and place-based writing. You will also contribute your own thoughtful, informed observations about traveling through essays, photo-collages, and videos. Your experiences are the foundation for everything that you create in this course.

ENGL 2700 Creative Writing

Section 01
Instructor: Professor Christen Enos
Sequence:  A – MR 11:45-1:25

Section 02
Instructor: Professor Jeremy Bushnell
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20

Section 03 *with Service Learning*
Instructor:
Professor Kat Gonso
Sequence: 3 – MWR 10:30-11:35
Attributes:

Course description – sections 1 & 2: In this introductory course, we will explore three genres of creative writing: fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will work through the process of generating their own creative pieces, including brainstorming, drafting, workshopping, and revising. In addition, we will study various examples from each genre, examining form, theme, and language.

Course description – section 3: ENGL 2700 gives developing writers an opportunity to practice writing in a community setting, featuring discussion of published and student work. This specific iteration of the course will primarily examine fiction and memoir. This course is meant to be generative, meaning that you’ll walk away with new work. In short, this course is meant to fuel your literary curiosities, talents, and inclinations, so that you can leave with a clearer image of who you are – or rather, who you might be – as a writer. Offers students an opportunity to attend readings, lectures, and other community literacy events and work with community partners on creative projects.

ENGL 2710 Style and Editing

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt
Sequence: A – 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

Style is often thought of as the clothes with which we dress our thoughts. Such an understanding tends to sepa­rate what we say from how we say it. Since antiquity, philosophers and others have urged speakers and writers to speak as plainly as possible to allow the truth of their thoughts to emerge unadulterated by lan­guage. Others have argued that language and thought cannot be so neatly separated, that what we say cannot be disentangled from how we say it. Drawing on the rhetorical tradition, this course explores the relationship between style and substance through close attention to choices made at the level of the document, paragraph, sentence, and word. You will develop a vocabulary for describing the stylistic techniques of other authors, and then you’ll use the practices of imitation to make these techniques your own. The course will also cover copyediting and proofreading, giving you practice in achieving the clear style so highly valued today. By the end of the course, you will be able to assess the editing needs of documents and use copyediting marks, style sheets, and reference materials to edit documents accurately and consistently. Assignments will include a style blog, tests, short papers, and an editing project.

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts

Instructor: Professor Qianqian Zhang-Wu
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Writing, Diversity
  • NUPath Engaging Diversity & Difference (DD), Interpreting Culture (IC), Writing-Intensive in the Major (WI)
  • Counts as an elective towards the Writing Minor

This course situates writing in global contexts, and explores the deep connections between cultural/linguistic diversity and critical issues in relation to power, identity, race, education and social justice. Students are offered an opportunity to learn about language policies at micro and macro levels, the relationship between language, identity and power, the global trend of World English(es), and how to rethink writing in global contexts drawing upon contemporary theories of cultural and linguistic diversity (e.g., sociolinguistics, translanguaging, raciolinguistics etc.). Through this course, students are also invited to explore multilingual communities and/or their family language histories through empirical or archival research to put theories and concepts into practice.

ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text

Instructor: Professor Ryan Cordell
Sequence: D – TF 9:50-11:30
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Theories & Methods, Experiential
  • NUCore: Humanities Level 1, Math/Anly Think Lvl 2
  • NUPath Analyzing Data (AD), Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation (EI), Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience (EX)
  • Counts as an elective towards the Writing Minor
  • Counts towards Digital and Computational Methods for the Digital Methods in the Humanities Minor

When you hear the word “technology,” you may think of your computer or smart phone. You probably don’t think of the alphabet, the book, or the printing press: but each of these was a technological innovation that changed dramatically how we communicate and perhaps even how we think. Literature has always developed in tandem with—and often in direct response to—the development of new media technologies—e.g. moveable type, the steam press, the telegraph, radio, film, television, the internet. Our primary objective in Technologies of Text will be to develop ideas about the ways that such innovations shape our understanding of classic and contemporary texts, as well as the people who write, read, and interpret them. We will compare our historical moment with previous periods of textual and technological upheaval. Many debates that seem unique to the twenty-first century—over privacy, intellectual property, information overload, and textual authority—are but new iterations of familiar battles in the histories of technology, new media, and literature. Through the semester we will get hands-on experience with textual technologies new and old through labs in letterpress printing, bibliography, digital editing, and computational text analysis, including through field trips to museums, libraries, and archives in the Boston area.

ENGL 3377 Poetry Workshop

Instructor: Professor Frank Blessington
Sequence: E – WF 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

Fundamentals of writing poetry: what makes your poetry poetry. Finding your voice. Further developments into different forms, free and metrical. Developing your judgment. You and your audience.

ENGL 3378 Fiction Workshop

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20
Attributes:

This is a fiction-writing workshop, the objective of which is to get you started on the novel you always wanted to write. With an eye to producing material worthy of publication, our primary objective is for you to produce at least two solid chapters (the first and a subsequent chapter) and an enticing synopsis which will serve as bases to develop and eventually present to a literary agent and or editor. Any fictional genre is acceptable—mainstream, literary, mystery, thriller, horror, science fiction, romance, western, etc.—all but vampire or zombie stories. Those have been overdone. I do not encourage writing short stories since they don’t sell. You will be expected to read your own material in class for round-table response and to offer comments on others’ material.

ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing

Instructor: Professor Neal Lerner
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20
Attributes:

The purpose of this course is three-fold. It is designed to help students reflect on and improve their writing. It is also designed to help students explore and understand the complex processes involved in written composition. Finally, it is designed to prepare students to become writing consultants. As consultants, students will be able to apply the knowledge they are gaining in the course to help other students–particularly high-school students in collaboration with a Boston Public School and 826 Boston– improve their writing. ENGL 3381 satisfies the experiential learning and theories & methods requirement for English majors, the theories & methods requirement for Writing minors, and is an elective option for Rhetoric minors.

ENGL 4000 Witchcraft & Literature in the Renaissance

Instructor: Professor Frank Blessington
Sequence: D – TF 9:50-11:30
Attributes:

The European witch-craze tragically took 50,000 lives, but witchcraft in general stimulated great writers. We shall read works by Shakespeare, Milton, Ben Jonson, Marlowe, and other dramatists, as well as works by demonologists and court records of Europe and colonial America. We shall include music, art, and film.

ENGL 4020 Gender & Empire

Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Dillon
Sequence: B – MW 2:50-4:30
Attributes:

The eighteenth century was an era of revolution in the Atlantic World: the American Revolution, the French Revolution, and the Haitian Revolution all occurred in the closing years of the century. In this class we will survey 18th-century American literature in light of the tumultuous changes wrought by revolution, viewing the literature and culture of the period through the shifting lenses of empire and nationhood. We will focus, in particular, on the relation of gender and race to empire and nationhood and will read across a range of genres, from slave narratives, to captivity narratives, to poetry, novels, and plays of the period.

ENGL 4040 Ability/Disability

Instructor: Professor Sari Altschuler
Sequence: B – MW 2:50-4:30
Attributes:

Disability is an inclusive category; if we are not disabled already, we will all almost certainly find ourselves disabled at some point in our lives and, if we live long enough, it is how we live out our remaining years. Disability describes “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities,” including impairments that range from depression to diabetes and from Down Syndrome to mobility impairments. Roughly 20% of the population is disabled, which means that even if we do not consider ourselves disabled, most of us already have or will have intimate experience with disability through family or friends. Nevertheless, the popular use of the word disability in this way emerged only in the late eighteenth century. This course will trace the emergence of a codified idea of disability—and, its counterpart, ability—in nineteenth-century literary texts like Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. We will focus not only on the development of representations of disability, but also the development of the idea of disability in relation to the changing circumstances of impaired individuals in the long nineteenth century. We will also consider how disability is shaped by race, class, and gender and in relation to issues such as labor, politics, and sexuality.

ENGL 4400 Opening the Archive

Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Dillon
Sequence: A – MR 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Theories & Methods, Experiential
  • NUPath Interpreting Culture (IC), Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience (EX), Writing-Intensive in the Major (WI)

Offers a seminar designed to introduce students to the rich archival holdings in the greater Boston area and to offer training in the materials and methods of primary source research. Primary materials include a wide range of resources, including books, manuscripts, letters, pamphlets, broadsides, journals, maps, illustrations, photographs, etc., from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries.

ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: Literature and the Visual Arts

Instructor: Professor Erika Boeckeler
Sequence: 4 – MWR 1:35-2:40
Attributes:

Both literature and the visual arts offer us tools for grappling with and exploring the big questions surrounding human and non-human existence. In a highly interactive way, this course will allow you to approach those questions by examining the foundations shared and crossovers between literature and the visual arts. How is looking at a painting like or not like reading a story?  We will read theories that articulate-often unsuccessfully- distinctions between literature and the visual arts. What power structures does it serve to maintain strict distinctions between the two? All written literature is visual. (Just look at the words you are reading right now!) How does the literary interact with its own visual presence and affect your reading? We will study moments in history and specific genres in which the work of creating visual and literary art especially and self-consciously dovetails, such as medieval manuscripts, pattern poetry, maps, or graphic novels.  We will examine the shared material foundations of visual and literary art, such as parchment, paper, ink, engravings, or computer screens. We will read literature in which the experience of visual art is central, and look at visual works featuring or inspired by literary texts. What is the allure of the literary for visual artists?  Each week will include one class visit to the rich local museum and rare book archives nearby.

HONR 3310 Building a (Better) Book

Instructor: Professor Ryan Cordell
Sequence: E – 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

What is a book, and what might it become? In this studio-based course, students investigate intersections among media, literature, and computation in order to understand the history of the book and imagine its future. Students cultivate new technical skills that will enable them to effectively use a range of historical and contemporary textual technologies, including letterpress, binding, 3D printing, and interactive, online storytelling. The course draws extensively on resources such as Huskiana Press, NU’s new experiential letterpress studio, and Snell Library’s 3D Printing Studio. Students use the skills they develop over the course of the semester to develop multimodal creative or research projects, building their own print-digital books. As a studio course, “Building a (Better) Book” centers around students’ conceiving, developing, and workshopping these independent projects. In addition, the course includes a number of trips to archives and museums around the Boston area such as the Massachusetts Historical Society, local letterpress shops, and Boston Cyberarts.

HONR 3310 Slam & Social Justice

Instructor: Professor Ellen Noonan
Sequence: D – TF 9:50-11:30
Attributes:

The title of the course may seem fairly straightforward: Slam Poetry and Social Justice. Those concepts, though, those “performances,” can be complicated (and I am using “complicated” as both verb and adjective here), and that complicating will be the work of our class. We’ll start with questions: What is Slam Poetry? How is it made, performed? What is Social Justice? How is it made, performed? How do we integrate these so that poetry can work towards social justice, so that social justice might have poetry’s energy, immediacy, and grace? These are my opening questions: we will ask many more questions together, while also reading many kinds of texts, and writing, performing, and workshopping our own texts in a collaborative writing and learning space where all voices will be valued and heard.

HONR 3310 The Politics of Comedy

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen
Sequence: 4 – MWR 1:35-2:40
Attributes:

Course description TBD

ENGL by Major Requirement

Foundational

ENGL 1000 English at Northeastern

Instructor: Professor Neal Lerner
Sequence:  W 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

Intended for first-year students in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Introduces first-year students to the liberal arts in general; familiarizes them with their major; helps them develop the academic skills necessary to succeed (analytical ability and critical thinking); provides grounding in the culture and values of the University community; and helps them develop interpersonal skills—in short, familiarizes students with all skills needed to become a successful university student.

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt
Sequence:  4 – MWR 1:35-2:40
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Foundational or Theories & Methods
  • NUCore Humanities Lvl 1
  • NUPath Interpreting Culture (IC), Understanding Societies & Institutions (SI)
  • Counts as a Theories & Methods req. for the Writing Minor
  • Fulfills a required elective for the Rhetoric Minor

How do we persuade others to change their minds or take action? How do we come to beliefs about ourselves, each other, and the world around us? What is the relationship between language and truth, between knowledge and belief? How do verbal as well as nonverbal symbols–such as images, architecture, clothing, and music–influence what we do, believe, and think we know? This course explores these questions by examining the work of writers who articulate a wide range and diversity of rhetorical theory. We will read theoretical texts with an eye toward applying them in contemporary contexts. Assignments include informal writing, several short papers, and a take-home final.

ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies

Section 01

Instructor: Professor Kathleen Kelly
Sequence:  B – MW 2:50-4:30

Section 02

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen
Sequence:  D – 9:50-11:30
Attributes:

Offers a foundational course designed for English majors. Introduces the methods and topics of English literary and textual studies, including allied media (e.g., film, graphic narrative). Explores strategies for reading, interpreting, and theorizing about texts; for conducting research; for developing skills in thinking analytically and writing clearly about complex ideas; and for entering into written dialogue with scholarship in the diverse fields that comprise literary studies.

ENGL 1700 Global Literature to 1500

Instructor: Professor Marina Leslie
Sequence: 4 – MWR 1:35-2:40
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Foundational
  • NUCore Humanities Lvl 1
  • NUPath Engaging Difference & Diversity (DD), Interpreting Culture (IC)

The reconsideration of “Global Literature” over that past thirty years or so arises out of a desire to break down barriers that have traditionally kept literatures of the world separate, divided by language, nationalism, geography, and politics. In this course devoted to the study of classical, medieval, and early modern works, we will travel to distant times and across vast geographies to share experiences at once alien and familiar: war, love, vengeance, betrayal, triumph, encompassing the full range of human experience and the height of its artistry. We will read some of the most important and revered texts in the world, whose stories formed and continue to influence a number of enduring literary and cultural traditions. All texts will be in translation, including: the Mesopotamian poem, Gilgamesh, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey; Ferdowsi’s Persian epic Shahnameh; The Irish national epic, Táin Bó Cúailnge; Murasaki Shikibu’s Tale of Genji, Dante Alighieri’s Inferno and Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote. For this introductory survey course, assignments will include regular Blackboard posts, a take-home midterm, a creative/critical assignment that examines the afterlife of the classic texts we are studying together, and an in-class final.

Literary Periods

Early Literatures

ENGL 1600 Introduction to Shakespeare

Instructor: Professor Erika Boeckeler
Sequence: 3 – MWR 10:30-11:35
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Early Literatures
  • NUCore Humanities Lvl 1
  • NUPath Interpreting Culture (IC), Understanding Societies & Institutions (SI)

An introduction to Shakespeare’s plays in every genre, this course emphasizes questions of language and modes of reading as entryways into key themes and topics (e.g., gender, identity, kin/g/ship, desire) within the Bard’s corpus. An initial in-depth study of the first play will provide a foundational knowledge of rhetorical strategies, considerations of performance, thematic development, and historical context that will then shimmer throughout discussions of the other plays. We will also seek to answer the question: How does Shakespeare help us think through today’s world?

ENGL 4000 Witchcraft & Literature in the Renaissance

Instructor: Professor Frank Blessington
Sequence: D – TF 9:50-11:30
Attributes:

The European witch-craze tragically took 50,000 lives, but witchcraft in general stimulated great writers. We shall read works by Shakespeare, Milton, Ben Jonson, Marlowe, and other dramatists, as well as works by demonologists and court records of Europe and colonial America. We shall include music, art, and film.

17th-18th Centuries

ENGL/AFAM 2296 Early African American Literature

Instructor: Professor Nicole Aljoe
Sequence: E – WF 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s 17th-18th Centuries, Diversity
  • NUCore Comparative Studies of Literature
  • NUPath Engaging Difference & Diversity (DD), Interpreting Culture (IC)

Recent archival research and canon reconsideration has revealed the wealth and variety of texts written by black writers during the 18th and 19th centuries, before the Harlem Renaissance. Drawing on this work, we will investigate the ways in which these early Black writers engaged with a range of issues such as the nature of the individual subject; human rights; gender and class; the rapid expansion of print culture; the development of the novel and other genres; notions of Africa; and of course, notions of freedom and enslavement. Through reading a variety of texts such as: poetry, speeches, essays, letters, fiction, slave narratives, biographies, and autobiographies—we will not only get a sense of the transnational complexity of Early Black literary cultures but also appreciate how these writers created the foundations for various literary traditions across the African Diaspora. Authors may include: Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Frances E.W. Harper, Solomon Northup, Lemuel Haynes, and Pauline Hopkins.

ENGL 4020 Gender & Empire

Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Dillon
Sequence: B – MW 2:50-4:30
Attributes:

The eighteenth century was an era of revolution in the Atlantic World: the American Revolution, the French Revolution, and the Haitian Revolution all occurred in the closing years of the century. In this class we will survey 18th-century American literature in light of the tumultuous changes wrought by revolution, viewing the literature and culture of the period through the shifting lenses of empire and nationhood. We will focus, in particular, on the relation of gender and race to empire and nationhood and will read across a range of genres, from slave narratives, to captivity narratives, to poetry, novels, and plays of the period.

19th-Century

ENGL 4040 Ability/Disability

Instructor: Professor Sari Altschuler
Sequence: B – MW 2:50-4:30
Attributes:

Disability is an inclusive category; if we are not disabled already, we will all almost certainly find ourselves disabled at some point in our lives and, if we live long enough, it is how we live out our remaining years. Disability describes “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities,” including impairments that range from depression to diabetes and from Down Syndrome to mobility impairments. Roughly 20% of the population is disabled, which means that even if we do not consider ourselves disabled, most of us already have or will have intimate experience with disability through family or friends. Nevertheless, the popular use of the word disability in this way emerged only in the late eighteenth century. This course will trace the emergence of a codified idea of disability—and, its counterpart, ability—in nineteenth-century literary texts like Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. We will focus not only on the development of representations of disability, but also the development of the idea of disability in relation to the changing circumstances of impaired individuals in the long nineteenth century. We will also consider how disability is shaped by race, class, and gender and in relation to issues such as labor, politics, and sexuality.

20th-21st Centuries

ENGL/ARTE 2301 The Graphic Novel

Instructor: Professor Hillary Chute
Sequence: A – 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

The Graphic Novel explores the word-and-image medium of comics as a narrative form.  It focuses in specific on the contemporary phenomenon of the so-called graphic novel.  What are the preoccupations of today’s graphic novels?  How does their storytelling work? We will read some work in translation, but will largely concentrate on the American tradition, focusing on fiction, memoir, and nonfiction reporting and adaptation.  Throughout, we will attend to practices of reading—and making—comics.  We will pay special attention to the formal language, or grammar, of comics in order to interpret its narrative procedure and possibilities.

ENGL 2440 The Modern Bestseller

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
Sequence: *Cancelled*

Update: this class is no longer being taught in Fall 2020 as of 3/18/20.

Comparative

ENGL 1120 Trouble in Utopia

Instructor: Professor Marina Leslie
Sequence:  3 – MWR 10:30-11:35
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Comparative
  • NUCore Writing-Intensive in the Major
  • NUPath Exploring Creative Expression & Innovation (EI), Interpreting Culture (IC), Writing-Intensive in the Major (WI)

When the world is on fire and a terrifying variety of previously unthinkable doomsday scenarios seem to be migrating from the pages of science fiction novels to the front pages of newspapers, what is the place of utopia? This seminar will take on that question squarely to explore utopia as a site for literary, political, social, and personal experimentation. Utopia has gotten a bad rap for representing an essentially naïve effort to escape from reality. However, from its origins, utopian narrative has been a multi-disciplinary site for seriously thinking through the theory and practice of radical reform. The most important utopian thinkers have been far from dreamy idealists. For example, two of the most famous Renaissance utopian thinkers, Thomas More and Francis Bacon, were both utopian fabulists and Lord Chancellors of England; and their utopias had real world impacts that neither of them could have imagined. In this class we will read utopian fiction from its classical and early modern origins (Plato, More, Bacon, etc) to contemporary popular culture and science fiction (Italo Calvino, Donna Haraway, Octavia Butler, Neal Stephenson, Ursula K. LeGuin, N.K. Jemisin, etc.), responding to this long and yet discontinuous history with critical and creative exercises. Required assignments: Short in-class writing exercises and Blackboard posts plus two longer projects: For the midterm project, you will identify and critique a contemporary utopian experiment. For the final project, you will produce and analyze your own creative utopian “artifact.” Together we will consider utopia—past, present, and future—in its many forms, as no place, good place, paradox, map, charter, idea, conversation, impossibility, disaster, and hope.

ENGL 2510 Horror Fiction

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
Sequence: 3 – MWR 10:30-11:35 AM
Attributes:

This course explores English and American horror fiction from Edgar Allan Poe, Bram Stoker (author of Dracula), to contemporary writers such as Stephen King, Shirley Jackson, Dean Koontz,  Tananarive Due, Neil Gaiman, and Clive Barker. Using short stories, novels, and movies (from adaptations of Dracula to Jordan Peele’s “Get Out”), we will examine the evolution of horror fiction and the various themes, techniques, and uses of the macabre—that is, depictions of the frightening, the gruesome, and death. We will also explore the nature of Evil and the various depictions of it in our readings.

Student writing: announced quizzes, midterm & final take-home essay exams (7-10 pages); optional critical analysis of some horror work not read in the course (7-10 pages).

ENGL 2695 Travel Writing

Section 01

Instructor: Professor Kelly Garneau
Sequence:  Online

Section 02

Instructor: Professor Jon Benda
Sequence: Online
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Comparative or Writing (either/or; cannot count for both)
  • NUPath Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation (EI), Interpreting Culture (IC)
  • Counts as an elective towards the Writing Minor

I’m betting that many of you have a phone full of pictures of places you’ve visited, even for a day. People love taking selfies in front of world-famous places—Stonehenge, Niagara Falls, the Taj Mahal, Mt. Fuji. We take pictures, collect postcards, and buy souvenirs to remind us of the experiences we’ve had across town, across the country, across the world. We are enlarged each time we reach beyond what is known and familiar.

This course is intended to enrich your experiences away from home. You will learn about travel writing and place-based writing by reading examples of the two genres (many about the place where you are), as well as reading what experienced travel writers, critics, and scholars have to say about travel writing and place-based writing. You will also contribute your own thoughtful, informed observations about traveling through essays, photo-collages, and videos. Your experiences are the foundation for everything that you create in this course.

HONR 3310 The Politics of Comedy

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen
Sequence: 4 – MWR 1:35-2:40
Attributes:

Course description TBD

Theories & Methods

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt
Sequence:  4 – MWR 1:35-2:40
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Foundational or Theories & Methods
  • NUCore Humanities Lvl 1
  • NUPath Interpreting Culture (IC), Understanding Societies & Institutions (SI)
  • Counts as a Theories & Methods req. for the Writing Minor
  • Fulfills a required elective for the Rhetoric Minor

How do we persuade others to change their minds or take action? How do we come to beliefs about ourselves, each other, and the world around us? What is the relationship between language and truth, between knowledge and belief? How do verbal as well as nonverbal symbols–such as images, architecture, clothing, and music–influence what we do, believe, and think we know? This course explores these questions by examining the work of writers who articulate a wide range and diversity of rhetorical theory. We will read theoretical texts with an eye toward applying them in contemporary contexts. Assignments include informal writing, several short papers, and a take-home final.

ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text

Instructor: Professor Ryan Cordell
Sequence: D – TF 9:50-11:30
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Theories & Methods, Experiential
  • NUCore: Humanities Level 1, Math/Anly Think Lvl 2
  • NUPath Analyzing Data (AD), Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation (EI), Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience (EX)
  • Counts as an elective towards the Writing Minor

When you hear the word “technology,” you may think of your computer or smart phone. You probably don’t think of the alphabet, the book, or the printing press: but each of these was a technological innovation that changed dramatically how we communicate and perhaps even how we think. Literature has always developed in tandem with—and often in direct response to—the development of new media technologies—e.g. moveable type, the steam press, the telegraph, radio, film, television, the internet. Our primary objective in Technologies of Text will be to develop ideas about the ways that such innovations shape our understanding of classic and contemporary texts, as well as the people who write, read, and interpret them. We will compare our historical moment with previous periods of textual and technological upheaval. Many debates that seem unique to the twenty-first century—over privacy, intellectual property, information overload, and textual authority—are but new iterations of familiar battles in the histories of technology, new media, and literature. Through the semester we will get hands-on experience with textual technologies new and old through labs in letterpress printing, bibliography, digital editing, and computational text analysis, including through field trips to museums, libraries, and archives in the Boston area.

ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing

Instructor: Professor Neal Lerner
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20
Attributes:

The purpose of this course is three-fold. It is designed to help students reflect on and improve their writing. It is also designed to help students explore and understand the complex processes involved in written composition. Finally, it is designed to prepare students to become writing consultants. As consultants, students will be able to apply the knowledge they are gaining in the course to help other students–particularly high-school students in collaboration with a Boston Public School and 826 Boston– improve their writing. ENGL 3381 satisfies the experiential learning and theories & methods requirement for English majors, the theories & methods requirement for Writing minors, and is an elective option for Rhetoric minors.

ENGL 4400 Opening the Archive

Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Dillon
Sequence: A – MR 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Theories & Methods, Experiential
  • NUPath Interpreting Culture (IC), Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience (EX), Writing-Intensive in the Major (WI)

Offers a seminar designed to introduce students to the rich archival holdings in the greater Boston area and to offer training in the materials and methods of primary source research. Primary materials include a wide range of resources, including books, manuscripts, letters, pamphlets, broadsides, journals, maps, illustrations, photographs, etc., from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries.

HONR 3310 Building a (Better) Book

Instructor: Professor Ryan Cordell
Sequence: E – 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

What is a book, and what might it become? In this studio-based course, students investigate intersections among media, literature, and computation in order to understand the history of the book and imagine its future. Students cultivate new technical skills that will enable them to effectively use a range of historical and contemporary textual technologies, including letterpress, binding, 3D printing, and interactive, online storytelling. The course draws extensively on resources such as Huskiana Press, NU’s new experiential letterpress studio, and Snell Library’s 3D Printing Studio. Students use the skills they develop over the course of the semester to develop multimodal creative or research projects, building their own print-digital books. As a studio course, “Building a (Better) Book” centers around students’ conceiving, developing, and workshopping these independent projects. In addition, the course includes a number of trips to archives and museums around the Boston area such as the Massachusetts Historical Society, local letterpress shops, and Boston Cyberarts.

Writing

ENGL 2695 Travel Writing

Section 01

Instructor: Professor Kelly Garneau
Sequence:  Online

Section 02

Instructor: Professor Jon Benda
Sequence: Online
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Comparative or Writing (either/or; cannot count for both)
  • NUPath Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation (EI), Interpreting Culture (IC)
  • Counts as an elective towards the Writing Minor

I’m betting that many of you have a phone full of pictures of places you’ve visited, even for a day. People love taking selfies in front of world-famous places—Stonehenge, Niagara Falls, the Taj Mahal, Mt. Fuji. We take pictures, collect postcards, and buy souvenirs to remind us of the experiences we’ve had across town, across the country, across the world. We are enlarged each time we reach beyond what is known and familiar.

This course is intended to enrich your experiences away from home. You will learn about travel writing and place-based writing by reading examples of the two genres (many about the place where you are), as well as reading what experienced travel writers, critics, and scholars have to say about travel writing and place-based writing. You will also contribute your own thoughtful, informed observations about traveling through essays, photo-collages, and videos. Your experiences are the foundation for everything that you create in this course.

ENGL 2700 Creative Writing

Section 01
Instructor: Professor Christen Enos
Sequence:  A – MR 11:45-1:25

Section 02
Instructor: Professor Jeremy Bushnell
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20

Section 03 *with Service Learning*
Instructor:
Professor Kat Gonso
Sequence: 3 – MWR 10:30-11:35
Attributes:

Course description – sections 1 & 2: In this introductory course, we will explore three genres of creative writing: fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will work through the process of generating their own creative pieces, including brainstorming, drafting, workshopping, and revising. In addition, we will study various examples from each genre, examining form, theme, and language.

Course description – section 3: ENGL 2700 gives developing writers an opportunity to practice writing in a community setting, featuring discussion of published and student work. This specific iteration of the course will primarily examine fiction and memoir. This course is meant to be generative, meaning that you’ll walk away with new work. In short, this course is meant to fuel your literary curiosities, talents, and inclinations, so that you can leave with a clearer image of who you are – or rather, who you might be – as a writer. Offers students an opportunity to attend readings, lectures, and other community literacy events and work with community partners on creative projects.

ENGL 2710 Style and Editing

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt
Sequence: A – 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

Style is often thought of as the clothes with which we dress our thoughts. Such an understanding tends to sepa­rate what we say from how we say it. Since antiquity, philosophers and others have urged speakers and writers to speak as plainly as possible to allow the truth of their thoughts to emerge unadulterated by lan­guage. Others have argued that language and thought cannot be so neatly separated, that what we say cannot be disentangled from how we say it. Drawing on the rhetorical tradition, this course explores the relationship between style and substance through close attention to choices made at the level of the document, paragraph, sentence, and word. You will develop a vocabulary for describing the stylistic techniques of other authors, and then you’ll use the practices of imitation to make these techniques your own. The course will also cover copyediting and proofreading, giving you practice in achieving the clear style so highly valued today. By the end of the course, you will be able to assess the editing needs of documents and use copyediting marks, style sheets, and reference materials to edit documents accurately and consistently. Assignments will include a style blog, tests, short papers, and an editing project.

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts

Instructor: Professor Qianqian Zhang-Wu
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Writing, Diversity
  • NUPath Engaging Diversity & Difference (DD), Interpreting Culture (IC), Writing-Intensive in the Major (WI)
  • Counts as an elective towards the Writing Minor

This course situates writing in global contexts, and explores the deep connections between cultural/linguistic diversity and critical issues in relation to power, identity, race, education and social justice. Students are offered an opportunity to learn about language policies at micro and macro levels, the relationship between language, identity and power, the global trend of World English(es), and how to rethink writing in global contexts drawing upon contemporary theories of cultural and linguistic diversity (e.g., sociolinguistics, translanguaging, raciolinguistics etc.). Through this course, students are also invited to explore multilingual communities and/or their family language histories through empirical or archival research to put theories and concepts into practice.

ENGL 3377 Poetry Workshop

Instructor: Professor Frank Blessington
Sequence: E – WF 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

Fundamentals of writing poetry: what makes your poetry poetry. Finding your voice. Further developments into different forms, free and metrical. Developing your judgment. You and your audience.

ENGL 3378 Fiction Workshop

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20
Attributes:

This is a fiction-writing workshop, the objective of which is to get you started on the novel you always wanted to write. With an eye to producing material worthy of publication, our primary objective is for you to produce at least two solid chapters (the first and a subsequent chapter) and an enticing synopsis which will serve as bases to develop and eventually present to a literary agent and or editor. Any fictional genre is acceptable—mainstream, literary, mystery, thriller, horror, science fiction, romance, western, etc.—all but vampire or zombie stories. Those have been overdone. I do not encourage writing short stories since they don’t sell. You will be expected to read your own material in class for round-table response and to offer comments on others’ material.

HONR 3310 Slam & Social Justice

Instructor: Professor Ellen Noonan
Sequence: D – TF 9:50-11:30
Attributes:

The title of the course may seem fairly straightforward: Slam Poetry and Social Justice. Those concepts, though, those “performances,” can be complicated (and I am using “complicated” as both verb and adjective here), and that complicating will be the work of our class. We’ll start with questions: What is Slam Poetry? How is it made, performed? What is Social Justice? How is it made, performed? How do we integrate these so that poetry can work towards social justice, so that social justice might have poetry’s energy, immediacy, and grace? These are my opening questions: we will ask many more questions together, while also reading many kinds of texts, and writing, performing, and workshopping our own texts in a collaborative writing and learning space where all voices will be valued and heard.

Diversity

ENGL/AFAM 2296 Early African American Literature

Instructor: Professor Nicole Aljoe
Sequence: E – WF 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s 17th-18th Centuries, Diversity
  • NUCore Comparative Studies of Literature
  • NUPath Engaging Difference & Diversity (DD), Interpreting Culture (IC)

Recent archival research and canon reconsideration has revealed the wealth and variety of texts written by black writers during the 18th and 19th centuries, before the Harlem Renaissance. Drawing on this work, we will investigate the ways in which these early Black writers engaged with a range of issues such as the nature of the individual subject; human rights; gender and class; the rapid expansion of print culture; the development of the novel and other genres; notions of Africa; and of course, notions of freedom and enslavement. Through reading a variety of texts such as: poetry, speeches, essays, letters, fiction, slave narratives, biographies, and autobiographies—we will not only get a sense of the transnational complexity of Early Black literary cultures but also appreciate how these writers created the foundations for various literary traditions across the African Diaspora. Authors may include: Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Frances E.W. Harper, Solomon Northup, Lemuel Haynes, and Pauline Hopkins.

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts

Instructor: Professor Qianqian Zhang-Wu
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Writing, Diversity
  • NUPath Engaging Diversity & Difference (DD), Interpreting Culture (IC), Writing-Intensive in the Major (WI)
  • Counts as an elective towards the Writing Minor

This course situates writing in global contexts, and explores the deep connections between cultural/linguistic diversity and critical issues in relation to power, identity, race, education and social justice. Students are offered an opportunity to learn about language policies at micro and macro levels, the relationship between language, identity and power, the global trend of World English(es), and how to rethink writing in global contexts drawing upon contemporary theories of cultural and linguistic diversity (e.g., sociolinguistics, translanguaging, raciolinguistics etc.). Through this course, students are also invited to explore multilingual communities and/or their family language histories through empirical or archival research to put theories and concepts into practice.

ENGL 4040 Ability/Disability

Instructor: Professor Sari Altschuler
Sequence: B – MW 2:50-4:30
Attributes:

Disability is an inclusive category; if we are not disabled already, we will all almost certainly find ourselves disabled at some point in our lives and, if we live long enough, it is how we live out our remaining years. Disability describes “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities,” including impairments that range from depression to diabetes and from Down Syndrome to mobility impairments. Roughly 20% of the population is disabled, which means that even if we do not consider ourselves disabled, most of us already have or will have intimate experience with disability through family or friends. Nevertheless, the popular use of the word disability in this way emerged only in the late eighteenth century. This course will trace the emergence of a codified idea of disability—and, its counterpart, ability—in nineteenth-century literary texts like Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. We will focus not only on the development of representations of disability, but also the development of the idea of disability in relation to the changing circumstances of impaired individuals in the long nineteenth century. We will also consider how disability is shaped by race, class, and gender and in relation to issues such as labor, politics, and sexuality.

Experiential in the Major

ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text

Instructor: Professor Ryan Cordell
Sequence: D – TF 9:50-11:30
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Theories & Methods, Experiential
  • NUCore: Humanities Level 1, Math/Anly Think Lvl 2
  • NUPath Analyzing Data (AD), Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation (EI), Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience (EX)
  • Counts as an elective towards the Writing Minor

When you hear the word “technology,” you may think of your computer or smart phone. You probably don’t think of the alphabet, the book, or the printing press: but each of these was a technological innovation that changed dramatically how we communicate and perhaps even how we think. Literature has always developed in tandem with—and often in direct response to—the development of new media technologies—e.g. moveable type, the steam press, the telegraph, radio, film, television, the internet. Our primary objective in Technologies of Text will be to develop ideas about the ways that such innovations shape our understanding of classic and contemporary texts, as well as the people who write, read, and interpret them. We will compare our historical moment with previous periods of textual and technological upheaval. Many debates that seem unique to the twenty-first century—over privacy, intellectual property, information overload, and textual authority—are but new iterations of familiar battles in the histories of technology, new media, and literature. Through the semester we will get hands-on experience with textual technologies new and old through labs in letterpress printing, bibliography, digital editing, and computational text analysis, including through field trips to museums, libraries, and archives in the Boston area.

ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing

Instructor: Professor Neal Lerner
Sequence: 2 – MWR 9:15-10:20
Attributes:

The purpose of this course is three-fold. It is designed to help students reflect on and improve their writing. It is also designed to help students explore and understand the complex processes involved in written composition. Finally, it is designed to prepare students to become writing consultants. As consultants, students will be able to apply the knowledge they are gaining in the course to help other students–particularly high-school students in collaboration with a Boston Public School and 826 Boston– improve their writing. ENGL 3381 satisfies the experiential learning and theories & methods requirement for English majors, the theories & methods requirement for Writing minors, and is an elective option for Rhetoric minors.

ENGL 4400 Opening the Archive

Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Dillon
Sequence: A – MR 11:45-1:25
Attributes:

  • Major Requirement/s Theories & Methods, Experiential
  • NUPath Interpreting Culture (IC), Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience (EX), Writing-Intensive in the Major (WI)

Offers a seminar designed to introduce students to the rich archival holdings in the greater Boston area and to offer training in the materials and methods of primary source research. Primary materials include a wide range of resources, including books, manuscripts, letters, pamphlets, broadsides, journals, maps, illustrations, photographs, etc., from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries.

Capstone

ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: Literature and the Visual Arts

Instructor: Professor Erika Boeckeler
Sequence: 4 – MWR 1:35-2:40
Attributes:

Both literature and the visual arts offer us tools for grappling with and exploring the big questions surrounding human and non-human existence. In a highly interactive way, this course will allow you to approach those questions by examining the foundations shared and crossovers between literature and the visual arts. How is looking at a painting like or not like reading a story? We will read theories that articulate-often unsuccessfully- distinctions between literature and the visual arts. What power structures does it serve to maintain strict distinctions between the two? All written literature is visual. (Just look at the words you are reading right now!) How does the literary interact with its own visual presence and affect your reading? We will study moments in history and specific genres in which the work of creating visual and literary art especially and self-consciously dovetails, such as medieval manuscripts, pattern poetry, maps, or graphic novels. We will examine the shared material foundations of visual and literary art, such as parchment, paper, ink, engravings, or computer screens. We will read literature in which the experience of visual art is central, and look at visual works featuring or inspired by literary texts. What is the allure of the literary for visual artists? Each week will include one class visit to the rich local museum and rare book archives nearby.

ENGL by Attribute

NUCore

NUCore

Capstone

ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: Literature and the Visual Arts (see Capstone)

Comparative Studies of Literature

ENGL/AFAM 2296 Early African-American Literature (see Literary Periods)

Humanities Level 1

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
ENGL 1600 Introduction to Shakespeare (see Literary Periods)
ENGL 1700 Global Literature to 1500 (see Foundational)
ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)

Mathematical/Analytical Thinking Level 2

ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)

Writing-Intensive in the Major

ENGL 1120 Trouble in Utopia (see Comparative)
ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies (see Foundational)
ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: Literature and the Visual Arts (see Capstone)

NUPath

NUPath

AD = Analyzing and Using Data

ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)

CE = Demonstrating Thought and Action in a Capstone

ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: Literature and the Visual Arts (see Capstone)

DD = Engaging Difference and Diversity

ENGL 1700 Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)
ENGL 2296 Early African-American Literature (see Literary Periods, Diversity)
ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)

EI = Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation

ENGL 1120 Trouble in Utopia (see Comparative)
ENGL/ARTE 2301 The Graphic Novel (see Literary Periods)
ENGL 2695 Travel Writing (online) (see Comparative, Writing )
ENGL 2700 Creative Writing (see Writing)
ENGL 2710 Style and Editing (see Writing)
ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)
ENGL 3377 Poetry Workshop (see Writing)
ENGL 3378 Fiction Workshop (see Writing)

EX = Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience

ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)
ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)
ENGL 4400 Opening the Archive (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)

IC = Interpreting Culture

ENGL 1120 Trouble in Utopia (see Comparative)
ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
ENGL/HIST/INSH 1300 Introduction to Health and Humanities
ENGL 1600 Introduction to Shakespeare (see Literary Periods)
ENGL 1700 Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)
ENGL 2296 Early African-American Literature (see Literary Periods, Diversity)
ENGL/ARTE 2301 The Graphic Novel (see Literary Periods)
ENGL 2695 Travel Writing (online) (see Comparative, Writing)
ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)
ENGL 4400 Opening the Archive (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)

SI = Understanding Societies and Institutions

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
ENGL 1600 Introduction to Shakespeare (see Literary Periods)

WI = Writing Intensive in the Major

ENGL 1120 Trouble in Utopia (see Comparative)
ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies (see Foundational)
ENGL 2710 Style and Editing (see Writing)
ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)
ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)
ENGL 4400 Opening the Archive (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)
ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: Literature and the Visual Arts (see Capstone)

ENGL by Minor

Courses for Minors

English Minor

Introductory Course Offerings*

  • ENGL 1120 Trouble in Utopia (see Comparative)
  • ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
  • ENGL/HIST/INSH 1300 Introduction to Health and Humanities
  • ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies (see Foundational)
  • ENGL 1600 Introduction to Shakespeare (see Literary Periods)
  • ENGL 1700 Global Literature to 1500 (see Foundational)

*Students in the English minor will need to contact Michaela Modica (m.kinlock@northeastern.edu) to have the ENGL 1400 registration restriction removed, as the class is currently only open to English majors and combined majors in Banner.


Rhetoric Minor

Elective

  • ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
  • ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)

Writing Minor Courses

Writing Theories & Methods

  • ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
  • ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)

Writing Electives

  • ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
  • ENGL/ARTE 2301 The Graphic Novel (see Literary Periods)
  • ENGL 2700 Creative Writing (see Writing)
  • ENGL 2710 Style and Editing (see Writing)
  • ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)
  • ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)
  • ENGL 3377 Poetry Workshop (see Writing)
  • ENGL 3378 Fiction Workshop (see Writing)
  • ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)

Digital Methods in the Humanities Minor

Digital and Computational Methods

  • ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods, Experiential)

Health, Humanities, and Society Minor

Introductory Course

  • ENGL/HIST/INSH 1300 Introduction to Health and Humanities

Humanities Requirement

  • ENGL 4040 Ability/Disability (see Literary Periods, Diversity)
  • ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: Literature and the Visual Arts (see Capstone)

Upcoming ENGL Course Offerings

Spring 2021 (subject to change)

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information and basic course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.


Foundational

  • ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies (WI)
  • ENGL 1410 Introduction to Writing Studies (WI)
  • ENGL 1700 Global Literature to 1500 (IC, DD)

Literary Periods – Early Literatures

  • ENGL 4000 Medieval Romance

Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries

  • ENGL 4020 Jane Austen

Literary Periods – 19th Century

  • ENGL 2320 19th-Century American Novels
  • ENGL 3190 19th-Century American Women Writers

Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries

  • ENGL 3730 20th- and 21-st Century Major Figure: James Joyce
  • ENGL 4060 The Posthuman

Comparative

  • ENGL 1500 British Literature to 1800
  • ENGL 2420 Contemporary Poetry
  • ENGL 2510 Horror Fiction
  • ENGL 2520 Science Fiction
  • ENGL 3190 19th-Century American Women Writers
  • ENGL 4070 Irish Short Story

Theories and Methods

  • ENGL 1140 Grammar: The Architecture of English
  • ENGL 1410 Introduction to Writing Studies (WI)
  • ENGL 2150 Literature & Digital Diversity (AD, DD)
  • ENGL 3325 Rhetoric of Law (IC)
  • ENGL 3700 Narrative Medicine (IC)

Writing

  • ENGL 2700 Creative Writing (EI)
  • ENGL 2740 Writing and Community Engagement (IC, WI, EX)
  • ENGl 2770 Writing to Heal (EI, WI)
  • ENGL 3375 Writing Boston (EI, IC, WI, EX)
  • ENGL 3376 Creative Nonfiction (EI, WI)
  • ENGL 3378 Fiction Workshop (EI)

Diversity

  • ENGL 2150 Literature & Digital Diversity (AD, DD)

Experiential in the Major

  • ENGL 3375 Writing Boston (EI, IC, WI, EX)

Capstone

  • ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar (2 sections – topics TBD)