Home » Undergraduate » Fall 2018 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2018 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2018

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.

Please note: 4000-level courses are open to all students (not just Juniors and Seniors), and everyone is encouraged to register for them. In the English Department, the course number designates the type of course, not the level of difficulty—4000-level courses are organized around a focused reading list and topic of analysis, and 1000-level classes are broad surveys.

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Fall 2018 Undergraduate English Courses by Major Requirement

Foundational

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt
Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM-2:40 PM, MWR)
Attributes:

How do we persuade others to change their minds or take action? How do we come to beliefs about ourselves, each other, and the world around us? What is the relationship between language and truth, between knowledge and belief? How do verbal as well as nonverbal symbols—such as images, architecture, clothing, and music—influence what we do, believe, and think we know? This course explores these questions by examining the work of writers who articulate a wide range and diversity of rhetorical theory. We will read theoretical texts with an eye toward applying them in contemporary contexts. Assignments include informal writing, a mid-term exam, two short papers, and a take-home final.

ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies

Section 1
Instructor: Professor Hillary Chute
Sequence: 2 (9:15 AM-10:20 AM, MWTh)
Attributes:

Offers a foundational course designed for English majors. Introduces the methods and topics of English literary and textual studies, including allied media (e.g., film, graphic narrative). Explores strategies for reading, interpreting, and theorizing about texts; for conducting research; for developing skills in thinking analytically and writing clearly about complex ideas; and for entering into written dialogue with scholarship in the diverse fields that comprise literary studies.

Section 2
Instructor: Professor Kathleen Kelly
Sequence: 4 (1:35 – 2:40 AM MWTh )
Attributes:

In this version of the course, we will read a number of poems, short stories, critical articles, and explore non-print materials, film, and video that will allow us to engage with ENGL 1400 goals in a variety of ways, both informal and formal. Much of the material that I have chosen is deliberately non-mainstream and non-canonical so that we can concentrate on the act and art of reading. Students choose material as well, on “Poems and Other Surprises Days,” devoted to reading poetry and whatever else we feel inspired to explore ad hoc. Requirements: brief responses to readings and two annotated papers—that is, students write a traditional paper and also mark it up with commentary on the process of writing and thinking about texts in a self-consciously theorized way.

ENGL 1700 Global Literatures to 1500

Instructor: Professor Francis Blessington
Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM-11:35 AM, MWR)
Attributes:

Readings in Greek, Roman, and biblical literature and beyond: Homer, Virgil, Old and New Testament, and Dante’s Inferno. The works all writers read. Emphasis upon background to Western culture and imagination: myth, literary genres and conventions, philosophy, and religion.

Literary Periods

Early Literatures

ENGL 3678 Bedrooms and Battlefields: Sex, Gender, and Ethnicity in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)

Instructor: Professor Lori Lefkovitz
Sequence: B (2:50 PM-4:30 PM, MW)
Attributes:

We will read stories from Hebrew Scripture in English translation, beginning with the Garden of Eden through the Book of Ruth, asking how these foundational narratives establish the categories that have come to define our humanity. We will look at how the Bible’s patterns of representation construct sexual and ethnic identities and naturalize ideas about such social institutions as “the family.” The course will analyze the Bible’s bedrooms and battlefields, repeated stories of identity masquerade, and metaphors of fluids and voices. We will read the Bible as a collection of stories that sets in motion one trajectory of the Western narrative tradition, and we will interrogate some of the basic assumptions of that tradition.

17th-18th Centuries

ENGL 2296 Early African American Literature

Instructor: Professor Nicole Aljoe
Sequence: A (11:45 AM-1:25 PM, MR)
Attributes:

This course will focus on 18th and early 19th century trans-Atlantic (African, American, British, and Caribbean) writing by members of the African Diaspora. Recent archival research and canon reconsideration has revealed the wealth and variety of texts written by black writers during this period. Drawing on this work, we will investigate the ways in which these early Black Atlantic writers engaged with a range of issues such as the nature of the individual subject; the rise of capitalism; the rapid expansion of print culture; the development of the novel; the cultures of neo-classicism, religious sentiment, and the sublime; the rise of nationalism; and of course, the expansion of the institution of slavery. Through reading a variety of texts such as: poetry, speeches, essays, letters, fiction, slave narratives, biographies, and autobiographies—we will not only get a sense of the complexity of Early Black Atlantic literary cultures but also appreciate how these writers participated in various global literary conversations. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in several public digital humanities projects and service learning activities designed to bring greater public awareness to the vibrancy of Early Black Literary cultures, and Early Black Boston history. Writers may include: Phillis Wheatley, Briton Hammon, John Marrant, Oluadah Equiano, Benjamin Banneker, Prince Hall, Paul Cuffee, David Walker, Maria Stewart, Solomon Northup, Frederick Douglass, and/or Harriet Jacobs.

19th Century

ENGL 3720 19th Century Major Figure: Jane Austen

Instructor: Nicole Keller
Sequence: B (2:50 PM-4:30 PM, MW)
Attributes:

Students in this course will read a selection of Jane Austen’s published novels, as well as consider film and other media versions inspired by the novels and/or Austen’s life. In addition to examining key contexts, themes, and literary conventions associated with the novels, students will also situate them within the broader historical developments of the novel in England during the long Eighteenth century (1688-1837).

20th-21st Centuries

ENGL 2301 The Graphic Novel

Instructor: Professor Hillary Chute
Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM-2:40 PM, MWR)
Attributes:

The word-and-image medium of comics as a narrative form. How to read comics—and what they teach us about reading—in addition to the creative practices that go into making them. We will examine antecedents including “engraved novels,” newspaper comic strips, “wordless novels,” underground comic books, and punk fanzines to understand the graphic novel’s rise in the 1970s in addition to exploring current directions. Authors include Art Spiegelman, Alison Bechdel, Chris Ware, Joe Sacco, Lynda Barry, Gary Panter, Phoebe Gloeckner, Keiji Nakazawa, and Marjane Satrapi, among others. Will include visits from artists to discuss the craft of this verbal-visual form.

ENGL 2440 The Modern Bestseller

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
Sequence: D (9:50 AM-11:30 AM, TF)
Attributes:

“Bestseller” is an artificial category determined solely by numbers of books sold. However, we will explore some reasons behind the success of recent quality bestselling novels–i.e., what special fantasies, obsessions, themes, plot lines, characters, action etc. appeal to popular tastes. The selections will represent a cross-section of mainstream and genres titles—mystery, thriller, literary–by men and women, some of whom who have become brand names.

Guest bestselling author(s) will visit class. We will also watch and discuss movies made from some novels studied in the course.

Student writing: announced quizzes; midterm & final take-home essay exams (7-10 pages each); optional critical paper analyzing a bestselling novel not read in the course.

Comparative

ENGL 1450 Reading & Writing in the Digital Age

Instructor: Professor Ryan Cordell
Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM-11:35 AM, MWR)
Attributes:

This first-year seminar, limited to 15 students, will investigate the long and sometimes tumultuous relationship between literature and new media technologies in order to better understand how digital technologies are reshaping the ways we read today. We will study literature that has shaped our technological imagination, such as science fiction, while grappling with the ways new technologies enable new kinds of literature, from novels and poetry to video games and social media. Students will historicize and engage the social and literary upheavals of our own technological moment through reading, discussion, and critical writing projects, as well as developing new technical skills for both reading and writing through hands-on practicums.

ENGL 2520 Science Fiction

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
Sequence: F (1:35 PM-3:15 PM, TF)
Attributes:

This course traces the development of various science fiction themes, conventions, and approaches from early human-versus-machine tales to alien encounters. We will examine how SF is a time capsule of ideas about the relationship between humans and technology, humans and nature, humans and the stars in all their promise and dangers. From Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, through H.G. Wells, through short fiction of the “golden age” (1940s and 50s), to the visions of current authors. Short stories, novels, movies.

Student writing: announced quizzes; midterm & final take-home essay exams (7-10 pages each); optional critical paper (7-10 page) analyzing some SF work.

Theories & Methods

ENGL 1140 Grammar: The Architecture of English

Instructor: Professor Janet Randall
Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM-11:35 AM, MWR)
Attributes:

What are the “nuts and bolts” of English? This course provides you with the basic tools for analyzing sentence structure and understanding how the building blocks of sentences – from articles to appositives – fit together. Using a precise vocabulary for talking about the elements of sentences, we will examine our mental grammatical “architecture”, a system of linguistic rules that we follow when we produce and understand sentences. Along the way, we will observe how structure affects meaning, and discover a new way to see the organizing principles of language.

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt
Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM-2:40 PM, MWR)
Attributes:

How do we persuade others to change their minds or take action? How do we come to beliefs about ourselves, each other, and the world around us? What is the relationship between language and truth, between knowledge and belief? How do verbal as well as nonverbal symbols—such as images, architecture, clothing, and music—influence what we do, believe, and think we know? This course explores these questions by examining the work of writers who articulate a wide range and diversity of rhetorical theory. We will read theoretical texts with an eye toward applying them in contemporary contexts. Assignments include informal writing, a mid-term exam, two short papers, and a take-home final.

ENGL 2150 Literature and Digital Diversity

Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Maddock Dillon
Sequence:
A (11:45 AM-1:25 PM, MR)
Attributes: 

This course focuses on the use of digital methods to analyze and archive literary texts, with particular attention to the ways in which digital methods can be used to expand (or limit) access to and understanding of literary texts by both canonical and historically marginalized writers and communities. The class will focus on three main areas: text encoding, textual analysis, and archive construction. We will consider literary texts and corpora including works by well-known authors such as Shakespeare, together with collections by marginalized writers, including slave narratives and writings by early modern women. Students will consider what counts as literature, and how computers, databases, and analytical tools give substance to social constructions of aesthetic, cultural, and intellectual value as inflected by race and gender.

ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing

Instructor: Professor Kat Gonso
Sequence: A (11:45 AM-1:25 PM, MR)
Attributes: 

Focuses on the teaching of writing by studying the professional literature of writing theory as well as a teaching practicum. Students work as a writing tutor or shadow experienced teachers. Offers students an opportunity to prepare for future teaching of writing and to obtain deeper insight into their own writing processes.

 

Writing

ENGL 2700 Creative Writing

Instructor: Professor Francis Blessington
Sequence: A (11:45 AM-1:25 PM, MR)
Attributes:

A course in writing the three genres of poem, story, and play. Workshop format. Text: Creative Writing by David Starkey, 2nd ed.

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts

Instructor: Professor Mya Poe
Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM-11:35 AM, MWR)
Attributes:

Explores the various ways that linguistic diversity shapes our everyday, academic, and professional lives. Offers students an opportunity to learn about language policy, the changing place of World English in globalization, and what contemporary theories of linguistic diversity, such as translingualism, mean for writing. Invites students to explore their own multilingual communities or histories through empirical or archival research.

ENGL 2780 Visual Writing: Writing Visuals

Instructor: Professor Somy Kim
Sequence: B (2:50 PM-4:30 PM, MW)
Attributes:

In this course we explore visual writing, asking how we communicate visually in particular rhetorical ecologies. A rhetorical ecology refers to the networked world of rhetoric—the writer, audience, message, context—but emphasizes the dynamic, social and political histories within which our visual writings live. Our readings cover distinct practices of visual composition and draw on theories of visual rhetoric to understand how writers and audiences interact in these rhetorical ecologies. We will examine photography, moving images, drawing, and text design to better master visual storytelling as students will create with sound, image, and text to write multimodal compositions. This means that students will not only produce photo and video essays, in addition to data representation in infographics, but will also investigate the ways that visual arguments travel globally through the everyday materiality of t-shirts, advertisements, websites, and other visual mediums. This interactive course culminates in an electronic portfolio and collective exhibit of course participants’ work.

ENGL 3376 Creative Non-Fiction

Instructor: Professor Neal Lerner
Sequence: A (11:45 AM-1:25 PM, MR)
Attributes:

Creative non-fiction is a genre in which writers apply narrative strategies and techniques to factual material. This course will orient writers within the genre as we address the following questions: What is creative non-fiction? What makes it different than other approaches to writing about factual material? What is the non-fiction writer’s obligation to “the truth”? What does the best creative non-fiction require of its writers? Over the semester we’ll read and write our way to answers through a variety of non-fiction forms, for example, narrative essays, travel and science writing, memoir, editorials. We’ll also practice cross-genre and hybrid forms, for example, non-fiction prose mixed with audio, video, or images. Class time will include lectures, discussion of readings, writing exercises, and weekly feedback for peers in a workshop format. The topics for creative non-fiction writing apply to a wide array of disciplines, including the humanities, the sciences, and journalism.

ENGL 3377 Poetry Workshop

Instructor: Professor Eunsong Kim
Sequence: F (1:35 PM-3:15 PM, TF)
Attributes: 

This course will focus on the writing and reading of poetry. We will experiment with a range of forms and techniques, from sestinas to blank and free verse, to ars poetica and epistolary poems. As we write and read each other’s poem, we will engage in discussions concerning the politics of form, the stakes of metaphor, the ethics of witness, and the tensions of documentation. Each week we will workshop a poem, and discuss the possibilities of new technique. Writers in the course will work to provide careful feedback for the poems presented in the workshop and work to experiment with various forms/techniques. Poets in the course will practice reading and memorizing their poetry and the poems of others, culminating in a final reading and class anthology. 

ENGL 3384 Writer’s Marketplace

Instructor: Professor Jeremy Bushnell
Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM-2:40 PM, MWR)
Attributes:

Explores the process of authorship in various genres (e.g., fiction, poetry, the first-person essay and other nonfiction) and for multiple platforms (online venues, and traditional print journals). Participants will gain experience in the process of writing, including workshopping, and will revise their work with an eye towards improving its odds of acceptance once submitted to an outlet. The class will be visited by an assortment of publication professionals, including working writers, agents, and editors: these guest speakers will supplement the course with their own personal insights into the changing character of the marketplace.

Diversity

ENGL 2150 Literature and Digital Diversity

Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Maddock Dillon
Sequence:
A (11:45 AM-1:25 PM, MR)
Attributes: 

This course focuses on the use of digital methods to analyze and archive literary texts, with particular attention to the ways in which digital methods can be used to expand (or limit) access to and understanding of literary texts by both canonical and historically marginalized writers and communities. The class will focus on three main areas: text encoding, textual analysis, and archive construction. We will consider literary texts and corpora including works by well-known authors such as Shakespeare, together with collections by marginalized writers, including slave narratives and writings by early modern women. Students will consider what counts as literature, and how computers, databases, and analytical tools give substance to social constructions of aesthetic, cultural, and intellectual value as inflected by race and gender.

ENGL 2296 Early African American Literature

Instructor: Professor Nicole Aljoe
Sequence: A (11:45 AM-1:25 PM, MR)
Attributes:

This course will focus on 18th and early 19th century trans-Atlantic (African, American, British, and Caribbean) writing by members of the African Diaspora. Recent archival research and canon reconsideration has revealed the wealth and variety of texts written by black writers during this period. Drawing on this work, we will investigate the ways in which these early Black Atlantic writers engaged with a range of issues such as the nature of the individual subject; the rise of capitalism; the rapid expansion of print culture; the development of the novel; the cultures of neo-classicism, religious sentiment, and the sublime; the rise of nationalism; and of course, the expansion of the institution of slavery. Through reading a variety of texts such as: poetry, speeches, essays, letters, fiction, slave narratives, biographies, and autobiographies—we will not only get a sense of the complexity of Early Black Atlantic literary cultures but also appreciate how these writers participated in various global literary conversations. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in several public digital humanities projects and service learning activities designed to bring greater public awareness to the vibrancy of Early Black Literary cultures, and Early Black Boston history. Writers may include: Phillis Wheatley, Briton Hammon, John Marrant, Oluadah Equiano, Benjamin Banneker, Prince Hall, Paul Cuffee, David Walker, Maria Stewart, Solomon Northup, Frederick Douglass, and/or Harriet Jacobs.

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts

Instructor: Professor Mya Poe
Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM-11:35 AM, MWR)
Attributes:

Explores the various ways that linguistic diversity shapes our everyday, academic, and professional lives. Offers students an opportunity to learn about language policy, the changing place of World English in globalization, and what contemporary theories of linguistic diversity, such as translingualism, mean for writing. Invites students to explore their own multilingual communities or histories through empirical or archival research.

ENGL 3678 Bedrooms and Battlefields: Sex, Gender, and Ethnicity in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)

Instructor: Professor Lori Lefkovitz
Sequence: B (2:50 PM-4:30 PM, MW)
Attributes:

We will read stories from Hebrew Scripture in English translation, beginning with the Garden of Eden through the Book of Ruth, asking how these foundational narratives establish the categories that have come to define our humanity. We will look at how the Bible’s patterns of representation construct sexual and ethnic identities and naturalize ideas about such social institutions as “the family.” The course will analyze the Bible’s bedrooms and battlefields, repeated stories of identity masquerade, and metaphors of fluids and voices. We will read the Bible as a collection of stories that sets in motion one trajectory of the Western narrative tradition, and we will interrogate some of the basic assumptions of that tradition.

Experiential in the Major

ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing

Instructor: Professor Kat Gonso
Sequence: A (11:45 AM-1:25 PM, MR)
Attributes: 

Focuses on the teaching of writing by studying the professional literature of writing theory as well as a teaching practicum. Students work as a writing tutor or shadow experienced teachers. Offers students an opportunity to prepare for future teaching of writing and to obtain deeper insight into their own writing processes.

Capstone (two sections)

ENGL 4710-01 Capstone Seminar: Green Your Read

Instructor: Professor Kathleen Kelly
Sequence: B (2:50 PM-4:30 PM, MW)
Attributes:

Have you ever wondered… why talking animals are featured so often in literature? … why it seems that we can’t get enough of stories about monsters? … if your future will look like Cormac McCarthy’s The Road?… why the tree is such a potent symbol?… about the ethics of Northeastern’s investment in fossil fuels at the same time that it promotes sustainability? … why “a dark and stormy night” is such a cliché—and a useful one? … if Henry David Thoreau meant all the things that he said? … about the relationship between race and place? (Flint, Michigan, for example?) … why “nature” is gendered female? … whether you should stop eating meat—or if you are vegetarian, whether you should try to persuade others to stop eating “food with a face”? … why there is no easy answer to solving climate change, and why we argue about it so rancorously? … if poetry has any place in a world in which CO2 levels are at a historic high? … what it means to be human?

The answers to these and other related questions can be found—or, at least, discussed with spirit and passion—in what we call the environmental or ecological humanities, which includes ecocriticism, animal studies, environmental history, and studies of what is called the posthuman condition.

In this version of the Junior-Senior Capstone, you are invited to develop a project of your choosing based on whatever it is you love to read (and/or watch at the movies), and green your read—that is, learn the vocabulary and the strategies that open up your text(s) to an ecological reading, broadly defined. In order to create a communal working space, we’ll spend the first third of the term familiarizing ourselves with a few key critical and theoretical texts, reading a handful of literary texts (poems and short fiction across a number of genres), and watching a film (most likely Hayao Miyazaki’s Princess Mononoke [1997], an excellent example of Japanese anime). Students will then pick a topic to develop for the final project. (Not necessarily based on what we read together in class—in fact, you might want to choose something assigned in another class.) We’ll compile a short reading list that targets students’ specific interests and concerns and begin drafting. We’ll spend the last third of the term workshopping papers.

Requirements: a brief working paper due around the sixth week, in-class responses to readings, a commitment to working with other students and their writing as well as to one’s own writing, and a final paper at the end of the term.

ENGL 4710-02 Capstone Seminar: Aesthetics, Technology & Race

Instructor: Professor Eunsong Kim
Sequence: D (9:50 AM-11:30 AM, TF)
Attributes:

This course will examine the relationship between literature, race and technology. We will examine the history of technological innovation through gendered and racialized frameworks, engaging with US Multi-Ethnic literature that examines reproductive labor, maintenance work, network and circulation theories, and surveillance technologies. As we read historical, theoretical and literary text that analyze the intersections between race, literature and technology, we will grapple with questions such as: how is work and labor imagined in literature and representation? How and when do these narratives become racialized? How and when do machines/workers become violent in the plot? We will read contemporary fiction and poetry and use critical race and feminist theory to navigate our questions.

Requirements: a critical reading blog, a midterm paper and a final ten-page research paper.

Fall 2018 English Courses by NUCore, NUpath

NUCore

NUCore

Capstone

ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar (see Capstone)

Comparative Study of Cultures

ENGL 2296  Early African American Literature (see 17th-18th Centuries, Diversity)

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)

Experiential Learning

ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing  (see Theories and Methods, Experiential Learning)

ENGL 3384 Writer’s Marketplace  (see Experiential LearningWriting)

Humanities Level 1

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric  (see Theories & MethodsFoundational)

ENGL 1450  Reading & Writing in the Digital Age (see Comparative)

ENGL 1700 Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)

Math/Anly Think Lvl 2

Writing-Intensive in the Major

ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies (see Foundational)

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)

ENGL 2780 Visual Writing: Writing Visuals (see Writing)

ENGL 3376 Creative Non-Fiction (see Writing)

ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing  (see Theories and Methods, Experiential Learning)

ENGL 3384 Writer’s Marketplace (see Writing, Experiential)

ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar (see Capstone)

NUpath

NUpath

AD = Analyzing and Using Data

ENGL 1450  Reading & Writing in the Digital Age (see Comparative)

ENGL 2150 Literature and Digital Diversity (see Theories and Methods, Diversity)

CE = Demonstrating Thought and Action in a Capstone

ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar (see Capstone)

DD = Engaging Difference and Diversity

ENGL 1700 Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)

ENGL 2150 Literature and Digital Diversity (see Theories and Methods, Diversity)

ENGL 2296  Early African American Literature (see 17th-18th Centuries, Diversity)

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)

EI = Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation

ENGL 2700 Creative Writing (see Writing)

ENGL 2780 Visual Writing: Writing Visuals (see Writing)

ENGL 3376 Creative Non-Fiction (see Writing)

ENGL 3377 Poetry Workshop (see Writing)

ENGL 3384 Writer’s Marketplace (see Writing, Experiential)

EX = Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience

ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing  (see Theories and Methods, Experiential Learning)

ENGL 3384 Writer’s Marketplace (see Writing, Experiential)

IC = Interpreting Culture

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)

ENGL 1450  Reading & Writing in the Digital Age (see Comparative)

ENGL 1700 Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)

ENGL 2296  Early African American Literature (see 17th-18th Centuries, Diversity)

ENGL 2300 The Graphic Novel (see 20th-21st Centuries)

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)

ENGL 2780 Visual Writing: Writing Visuals (see Writing)

ENGL 3678  Bedrooms and Battlefields:  Sex, Gender, and Ethnicity in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) (see Early Literatures, Diversity)

ND= Engaging with the Natural and Designed World

SI = Understanding Societies and Institutions

ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)

WI = Writing Intensive in the Major

ENGL 1400 Intro to Literary Studies (see Foundational)

ENGL 1450  Reading & Writing in the Digital Age (see Comparative)

ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)

ENGL 2780 Visual Writing: Writing Visuals (see Writing)

ENGL 3376 Creative Non-Fiction (see Writing)

ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing  (see Theories and Methods, Experiential Learning)

ENGL 3384 Writer’s Marketplace (see Writing, Experiential)

ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar (see Capstone)

English and Writing Minors

Courses for Minors in English, Rhetoric, and Writing

English Minor

Introductory Course Offerings

  • ENGL 1140 Grammar: The Architecture of English (see Theories & Methods)
  • ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
  • ENGL 1400 Intro to Literary Studies (see Foundational) *
  • ENGL 1450  Reading & Writing in the Digital Age (see Comparative)
  • ENGL 1700 Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)

Rhetoric Minor

Introductory Course Offering

  • ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)

Elective

  • ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing  (see Theories and Methods, Experiential Learning)

Writing Minor Courses

Writing Theories & Methods

  • ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
  • ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing  (see Theories and Methods, Experiential Learning)

Writing Electives

  • ENGL 1140 Grammar: The Architecture of English (see Theories & Methods)
  • ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric (see Foundational, Theories & Methods)
  • ENGL 2700 Creative Writing (see Writing)
  • ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts (see Writing, Diversity)
  • ENGL 2780 Visual Writing: Writing Visuals (see Writing)
  • ENGL 3376 Creative Non-Fiction (see Writing)
  • ENGL 3377 Poetry Workshop (see Writing)
  • ENGL 3381 The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing  (see Theories and Methods, Experiential Learning)
  • ENGL 3384 Writer’s Marketplace (see Writing, Experiential)

* Students in the English minor will need to contact Michaela (m.kinlock@northeastern.edu) or Linda  (li.collins@northeastern.edu) to have the ENGL 1400 registration restriction removed, as the class is currently only open to English majors and combined majors in Banner.

Upcoming Course Offerings

Spring 2019 (subject to change)

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information and basic course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.


Foundational

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 1400 Intro to Literary
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 1410 Introduction to Writing Studies

Literary Periods – Early Literatures

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 1600 Introduction to Shakespeare

Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 4020 Topics in 17th/18th Century Literatures

Literary Periods – 19th Century

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 4040 Topics in 19th Century Literatures

Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3730 Twentieth and Twenty-First Century “Larsen/Hurston”

Comparative

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 2420 Contemporary Poetry
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 2451 Postcolonial Women Writers
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 2510 Horror Fiction
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3572 Fantasy

Theories and Methods

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 1410 Introduction to Writing Studies
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3325 Rhetoric of Law
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3700 Narrative Medicine

Writing

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 2700 Creative Writing
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 2850 Writing for Social Media: Theory and Practice
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 2740 Writing and Community Engagement
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3377 Poetry Workshop
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3378 Fiction Workshop
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3380 Topics in Writing: Found Poetry
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3382 Publishing in the 21st Century

Diversity

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 2451 Postcolonial Women Writers, see also Comparative

Experiential in the Major

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 2740 Writing and Community Engagement, see also Writing
  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 3382 Publishing in the 21st Century, see also Writing

Capstone

  • Spring 2019 – ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar