Home » Undergraduate » Spring 2017 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Spring 2017 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Spring 2017

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.

Please note: 4000-level courses are open to all students (not just Juniors and Seniors), and everyone is encouraged to register for them. In the English Department, the course number designates the type of course, not the level of difficulty—4000-level courses are organized around a focused reading list and topic of analysis, and 1000-level classes are broad surveys.

Course Spotlights:

writing-courses-sp17-3

Full descriptions under “Writing”

Spring 2017 English Courses by Major Requirement

Foundational

Title: ENGL 1400 – Introduction to Literary Studies

Section 1:
Instructor:
Professor Sari Altschuler
CRN: 38387
Sequence:
3 (10:30-11:35AM MWR)

Section 2:
Instructor:
Professor Erika Boeckeler
CRN: 
35848
Sequence:
D (9:50-11:30AM TF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Foundational; NUCore Writing Intensive in the Major; NUpath WI

Description: This foundational course introduces the various disciplines that make up English Literary Studies. It explores strategies for reading, interpreting, and theorizing about texts; for conducting research; for developing skills in thinking analytically and writing clearly about complex ideas; and for entering into written dialogue with scholarship in the field. Readings include a mix of theoretical texts examining how, why, and what we read and a mix of literary genres from many periods, e.g. sci fi, fairy tales, the Bible, Walden, graphic novels, Shakespeare.

Title: ENGL 1410 – Introduction to Writing Studies

Instructor: Professor Mya Poe

CRN: 34710

Sequence: D (9:50-11:30AM TF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Foundational; NUCore Writing Intensive in the Major; NUpath WI

Description: Introduces students to the basic histories, theories, and methodologies surrounding how people learn to write and how writing is used in home, school, work, and civic contexts. Explores writing practices in the U.S. and in international contexts, including the social and political significance of writing in such cultural contexts. Class projects emphasize archival research and research on the development of writing practices, including students’ understanding of their own experiences and practices of other groups. Satisfies introductory course requirement for English majors.

Title: ENGL 1700 – Global Literatures to 1500

Instructor: Professor Francis Blessington

CRN: 33661

Sequence: 4 (1:35-2:40PM MWR)

Attributes: Major Requirement Foundational; NUCore Humanities Level 1; NUpath IC, DD

Description: Readings in Greek, Roman, and biblical literature and beyond: Homer, Virgil, Old and New testament, and Dante’s Inferno. The works all writers read. Emphasis upon background to Western culture and imagination: myth, literary genres and conventions, philosophy, and religion.

Literary Periods

Early Literatures

Title: ENGL 4000 – Topics in Early Literatures: King Arthur, Then & Now

Instructor: Professor Kathleen Kelly

CRN: 37736

Sequence: B (2:50-4:30PM MW)

AttributesMajor Requirement Literary Periods – Early Literatures

Description: The story of King Arthur, with literary beginnings in the sixth century, is best known to modern readers through film, from Edwin S. Porter’s Parsifal (1904) to Disney’s Sword in the Stone (1963) to Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (to be released on 24 March 2017: plan on a field trip!). In this course, we will read Arthurian legend (in translation) as it developed in the Middle Ages, and pair Arthurian romances with modern film adaptations as well as with modern poetry, fiction, fantasy, and sci-fi. Examples of texts paired with films: excerpts from Malory’s Morte Darthur (c. 1470) plus Boorman’s Excalibur (1981) and the musical Camelot (1967, an essential film in the history of the musical, and a fabulous 60s set-piece); the legend of Tristan and Iseult (c. 1200-1300) plus Jean Cocteau’s L’Eternel Retour (1947); Chaucer’s Wife of Bath’s Tale (c. 1385) plus the BBC modernization (2003). We will also read (in translation) a French romance, Le Roman de Silence (13th c.), about a transvestite knight—surely long overdue for a cinematic adaptation: as a class project, we’ll turn it into a screenplay. Additional requirements: brief in-class presentations and two short papers.

17th-18th Centuries

Title: ENGL 4020 (formerly 3160) Topics in 17th- & 18th-Century Literature: Race & Slavery in the 18th-Century British Novel

Instructor: Professor Nicole N. Aljoe

CRN: 37740

Sequence: D (9:50-11:30AM TF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries, Diversity

Description: The development of the novel in 18th-Century Britain occurred at the same time it was expanding its overseas empire and starting to reconsider its participation in the African Atlantic Slave Trade. Writers used the novel not only to record these aspects of 18th-Century society but also to weigh in on debates and questions about them. Building on the philosophical work of the Enlightenment period, they asked questions about the nature of humanity, the purpose of travel and encounter, the role of race and culture, and the significance of relationships amongst human beings. Initially dismissed as a genre of escapist entertainment, by the end of the century the novel would be transformed into a powerful vehicle for facilitating social protest. This course will explore a range of novels written between 1688 and 1832—considered the Long Eighteenth Century—in order to analyze the impact of debates about race and slavery on the development of the novel as a genre in Great Britain.

19th Century

Title: ENGL 2260 – Romantic Poetry

Instructor: Professor Stuart Peterfreund

CRN: 37338

Sequence: B (2:50-4:30PM MW)

Attributes: Major Requirement Literary Periods – 19th Century

Description: This course surveys the six canonical male English Romantic poets: William Blake; William Wordsworth; Samuel Taylor Coleridge; George Gordon, Lord Byron; Percy Bysshe Shelley; and John Keats. The course also incorporates writing by prominent female poets of the period, such as Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Joanna Baillie, Felicia Hemans, and Elizabeth Laetitia Landon. All of these poets wrote during the English Romantic Period (1789-1832), an era of significant social and intellectual change, although this change was not without its turbulence, confusion and, on too many occasions, its violence. The period was one in which English culture moved beyond traditional modes of knowledge, social organization, and belief, and into an intellectual, sociopolitical, and religious milieu in which the only certainty was uncertainty and the only constant was change. We will study the impact of the era on the individual, and the artistic response of that individual to the era. Students functioning in small work groups will take responsibility for framing some of the questions we should address in response to our reading. Grades in this course will be determined on the basis of three five-to-seven-page papers, written on topics chosen from a list of options.

Title: ENGL 4040 (formerly 3190) – Topics in 19th-Century American Literatures: Dis/Ability

Instructor: Professor Sari Altschuler

CRN: 37738

Sequence: 6 (11:45-12:50 TRF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Literary Periods – 19th Century, Diversity

Description: Disability is an inclusive category; if we are not disabled already, we will all almost certainly find ourselves disabled at some point in our lives and, if we live long enough, it is how we live out our remaining years. Disability describes “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities,” including impairments that range from depression to diabetes and from Down Syndrome to mobility impairments. Roughly 20% of the population is disabled, which means that even if we do not consider ourselves disabled, most of us already have or will have intimate experience with disability through family or friends.

Nevertheless, the popular use of the word disability in this way emerged only in the late eighteenth century. This course will trace the emergence of a codified idea of disability—and, its counterpart, ability—in nineteenth-century literary texts like Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. We will focus not only on the development of representations of disability, but also the development of the idea of disability in relation to the changing circumstances of impaired individuals in the long nineteenth century. We will also consider how disability is shaped by race, class, and gender and in relation to issues such as labor, politics, and sexuality.

Students in this class will complete two major assignments: 1) A five-page midterm paper analyzing one of the central texts in terms of the themes we are exploring together. These papers will be due at different points in the mid-semester for different students, as the perspectives introduced in them will help shape our group inquiry, and 2) an 8-10 page final research paper in which students will have the opportunity to pursue their own questions about the texts more fully. There will also be some smaller assignments aimed at helping student develop their ideas for the midterm.

20th-21st Centuries

Title: ENGL 2410 – Contemporary American Literature

Instructor: Professor Bonnie TuSmith

CRN: 37339

Sequence: A (11:45AM-1:25PM MR)

Attributes: Major Requirement Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries

Description: This course covers a range of contemporary American writers from the Civil Rights Era to the present (e.g., Toni Morrison, Junot Diaz, Michael Patrick MacDonald, Barbara Kingsolver, Louise Erdrich, Bob Dylan). Literary genres include novels, short stories, memoir, and poetry. Postmodernist and narrative theories serve as backbone for examining contemporary social issues through award-winning works of art. Course requirements include assigned readings (approx. 100-200 pages/week), brief weekly responses to readings (posted on Blackboard), two short papers, and a final paper.

Comparative

Title: ENGL 1500 – British Literature to 1800

Instructor: Professor Marina Leslie

CRN: 33660

Sequence: 4 (1:35-2:40PM MWR)

Attributes: Major Requirement Comparative; NUCore Humanities Level 1; NUpath IC, SI

Description:

This course surveys the topography of English literature and culture from the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf to Gulliver’s Travels, that is, from around the early 10th century to the 18th century. We will collect and examine a repertoire of shared traditions, genres, and themes and see how they are revised and reimagined over time. We will also explore the complex intersections of literary texts and their social contexts in a variety of forms, including the connections between courtly love and political rivalry, romance and exploration of the new world, epic and nation building.

Course requirements: class participation, regular Blackboard posts, a take-home midterm essay, a creative assignment, and a regularly-scheduled final exam.

Title: ENGL 2460 – Multiethnic Literatures of the US

Instructor: Professor Bonnie TuSmith

CRN: 37340

Sequence: B (2:50-4:30PM MW)

Attributes: Major Requirement Comparative, Diversity; NUCore Comp Stdy of Cultures; NUpath IC, DD

Description: This course studies narrative prose (e.g., short story, novel, memoir) by American writers from distinct ethnic groups (e.g., Native, Asian, African, Latino/a, Jewish, Italian, Irish, Arab), focusing on the theme of family as common ground across cultures. As works of art, each text is studied through its formal aspects as well as within its appropriate cultural-historical context. In-class activities include professor-led discussions, student-led “teach-in’s,” and the viewing of film excerpts. Course requirements include assigned readings (approx. 50-150 pages/week), brief weekly responses to readings (posted on Blackboard), two short papers, and a final paper.

Title: ENGL 2520 – Science Fiction

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian

CRN: 37341

Sequence: 2 (9:15-10:20AM MWR)

Attributes: Major Requirement Comparative

Description: This course traces the development of various science fiction themes, conventions, and approaches from early human-versus-machine tales to alien encounters. We will examine how SF is a time capsule of ideas about the relationship between humans and technology, humans and nature, humans and the stars in all their promise and dangers. From Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, through H.G. Wells, through short fiction of the “golden age” (1940s and 50s), to the visions of current authors, American and international authors. Short stories, novels, movies. Class visit by celebrated Science Fiction author(s).

Student writing: announced quizzes; midterm & final take-home essay exams (7-10 pages each); optional critical paper (7-10 page) analyzing some SF work not read in the course.

Theories & Methods

Title: ENGL 3340 – Technologies of Text

Instructor: Professor Ryan Cordell

CRN: 37343

Sequence: 11:45 am – 1:25 pm MR

Attributes: Major Requirement Theories & Methods, Experiential Learning;  NUCore Math/Anly Think Lvl 2; NUpath EI, AD

Description: Every old media was once new media, including moveable type, the steam press, radio, film, television, the internet. Many of the debates that seem unique to the twenty-first century—over privacy, intellectual property, and textual authority—are but new iterations of familiar battles this course will trace through its history of new media. The course is also experiential, asking students to experiment making texts as well as reading them. In “humanities lab” sessions students will work with text technologies new and old: e.g. paper making, setting type and printing on a letterpress, encoding in HTML and CSS, or writing code to computationally analyze text. This course aims to help students understand texts in terms of technology, labor, design, and medium through practices of critical reading and critical making.

Title: ENGL 4100 (formerly 3339) – Topics in Literary Criticism: Queer Theory, Literature, and Film

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen

CRN: 37906

Sequence: F (1:35-3:15PM TF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Theories & Methods

Description: This course will examine the discourse of Queer Theory along two lines of inquiry. First, we will be reading important queer literary works from Oscar Wilde to Alison Bechdel. These works are diverse in terms of historical period, national tradition, gender, race, and genre. Our task will be to ascertain how the term “queer” might offer a conceptual framework for these works that enables us to make connections across this diversity. We will simultaneously consider the ways in which “queer” might be an inadequate way to think about these works. As we read through this rich literary tradition, we will also engage with the dynamic body of critical work that makes up the discourse of queer theory. These works are experimental, theoretical, scientific, political, philosophical and historical—they represent a range of critical genres and a range of critical positions. We will attempt to connect these critical interventions with the literary works on the syllabus. Finally, the course will offer an optional series of sessions in which we will screen important queer films and media productions. Students should leave the course with a broad and rich introduction to queer literary and visual culture as well as the debates and texts of queer theory.

Writing

Title: ENGL 2710 – Style and Editing

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt

CRN: 37342

Sequence: F (1:35-3:15 TF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Writing; NUpath EI, WI

Description: Style is often thought of as the clothes with which we dress our thoughts. Such an understanding tends to separate what we say from how we say it. Since antiquity, philosophers and others have urged speakers and writers to speak as plainly as possible to allow the truth of their thoughts to emerge unadulterated by language. Others have argued that language and thought cannot be so neatly separated, that what we say cannot be disentangled from how we say it. Drawing on the rhetorical tradition, this course explores the relationship between style and substance through close attention to choices made at the level of the document, paragraph, sentence, and word. You will develop a vocabulary for describing the stylistic techniques of other authors, and then you’ll use the practices of imitation to make these techniques your own. The course will also cover copyediting and proofreading, giving you practice in achieving the clear style so highly valued today. By the end of the course, you will be able to assess the editing needs of documents and use copyediting marks, style sheets, and reference materials to edit documents accurately and consistently. Assignments may include a style blog, tests, short papers, and several editing projects.

Title: ENGL 2850 – Writing and Social Media

Instructor: Professor Cecelia Musselman

CRN: 38032

Sequence: D (9:50-11:30AM TF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Writing; NUpath EI, IC, WI

Description: Social media is now ever-present — we write and produce social media artifacts in private, in public, and for professional purposes. The ubiquity of social media at once privileges and expands literacy and written communication in time (permeating our days) and space (crossing social and national lines). This course examines our social media production as writing. Together, we will read writing studies research, popular and journalistic works, and from social media sites to investigate the role of social media in our rhetorical and writing skillsets and to examine how our social media personae are becoming blended personal/professional digital identities. The course will begin with readings and discussion to come to a description of what social media is and what it does in our lives and disciplines. Students will write in varied social media forms: very short tweet-like writing, longer individual works, and multi-faceted collaborative works. The course will have 4 phases: investigating and defining; building sites and creating identities; linking and outreach; revising and reflecting.

Title: ENGL 3378 – Fiction Workshop

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian

CRN: 34878

Sequence: 3 (10:30-11:35AM MWR)

Attributes: Major Requirement Writing; NUpath EI

Description: Because this is a fiction-writing workshop, the focus is on your writing—specifically a novel– with an eye to producing material worthy of publication. It’s a hands-on opportunity for you to polish your craft, work on your project, and to offer insights on classmates’ material. In effect, a kinder and gentler microcosm of the real writing world with a captive audience, instant editorial feedback from readers who care, and deadlines. If you have a novel idea in you, this is the opportunity to begin writing it. I discourage short stories, asking that you think big.) Thus, the course objective is for you to complete two polished novel chapters and a 3-4 page synopsis over the semester. You will be expected to read your material in class for roundtable responses and to offer comments on others’ material. Maximum 15 students.

Title: ENGL 3380 – Topics in Writing: Slam Poetry

Instructor: Professor Ellen Noonan

CRN: 35908

Sequence: F (1:35-3:15 TF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Writing; NUCore Writing Intensive in the Major; NUpath EI, WI

Description: Calling all poet-performers and performer-poets! In this course, we will learn about and write and do performance (slam) poetry. Together, we will explore the history of the genre, workshop texts—written and performed, and participate in the local slam scene—as audience members, and, perhaps, performers. Readings will include excerpts from Words in Your Face, The Cultural Politics of Slam Poetry, and Voicing American Poetry, and written/performed work will include a scholarly/creative nonfiction piece about slam, a review of a slam performance in the Boston area, an individual slam “chapbook”/performance, and a class “slam-thology.”

Title: ENGL 3382 – Publication Arts/Publishing in the 21st Century

Instructor: Professor Sebastian Stockman

CRN: 37344

Sequence: 4 (1:35-2:40PM MWR)

Attributes: Major Requirement Writing, Experiential Learning; NUCore Experiential Learning, Writing Intensive in the Major; NUpath WI

Description:

“Publishing in the 21st Century” offers students an investigative experience into publishing and writing. Students will explore a variety of questions, including but not limited to: What does it mean to be a publishing writer today? What does it mean to be a publisher today? How have technological advances and the social media craze changed the publishing industry?

As part of participating in an experiential-learning course, students will be required to attend local activities, such as readings, plays, lectures, and other community literacy events. Students will interview and profile a Boston-area writer or publisher to learn about the writing process, trends in the publishing field, and potential career paths. Students will compose and curate a class blog as a way to document and share their research and experiences. Finally, students will share their knowledge about writing through a collaboration with 826 Boston and our partner site, the Writers’ Room at the John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics & Science in Roxbury. Students will help younger writers develop and publish a book of their creative works. By the end of the course, students will have gained a better theoretical understanding of the art of publication, as well as practical experience with writing production and publication.

Diversity

Title: ENGL 2460 – Multiethnic Literature of the US

Instructor: Professor Bonnie TuSmith

CRN: 37340

Sequence: B (2:50-4:30PM MW)

Attributes: Major Requirement Comparative, Diversity; NUCore Comp Stdy of Cultures; NUpath IC, DD

Description: This course studies narrative prose (e.g., short story, novel, memoir) by American writers from distinct ethnic groups (e.g., Native, Asian, African, Latino/a, Jewish, Italian, Irish, Arab), focusing on the theme of family as common ground across cultures. As works of art, each text is studied through its formal aspects as well as within its appropriate cultural-historical context. In-class activities include professor-led discussions, student-led “teach-in’s,” and the viewing of film excerpts. Course requirements include assigned readings (approx. 50-150 pages/week), brief weekly responses to readings (posted on Blackboard), two short papers, and a final paper.

Title: ENGL 4020 (formerly 3160) – Topics in 17th & 18th Century Literature: Race & Slavery in the 18th-Century British Novel

Instructor: Professor Nicole N. Aljoe

CRN: 37740

Sequence: D (9:50-11:30AM TF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries, Diversity

Description: The development of the novel in 18th-Century Britain occurred at the same time it was expanding its overseas empire and starting to reconsider its participation in the African Atlantic Slave Trade. Writers used the novel not only to record these aspects of 18th-Century society but also to weigh in on debates and questions about them. Building on the philosophical work of the Enlightenment period, they asked questions about the nature of humanity, the purpose of travel and encounter, the role of race and culture, and the significance of relationships amongst human beings. Initially dismissed as a genre of escapist entertainment, by the end of the century the novel would be transformed into a powerful vehicle for facilitating social protest. This course will explore a range of novels written between 1688 and 1832—considered the Long Eighteenth-century—in order to analyze the impact of debates about race and slavery on the development of the novel as a genre in Great Britain.

Title: ENGL 4040 (formerly 3190) – Topics in 19th-Century American Literatures: Dis/Ability

Instructor: Professor Sari Altschüler

CRN: 37738

Sequence:  6 (11:45-12:50 TRF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Literary Periods – 19th Century, Diversity

Description: Disability is an inclusive category; if we are not disabled already, we will all almost certainly find ourselves disabled at some point in our lives and, if we live long enough, it is how we live out our remaining years. Disability describes “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities,” including impairments that range from depression to diabetes and from Down Syndrome to mobility impairments. Roughly 20% of the population is disabled, which means that even if we do not consider ourselves disabled, most of us already have or will have intimate experience with disability through family or friends.

Nevertheless, the popular use of the word disability in this way emerged only in the late eighteenth century. This course will trace the emergence of a codified idea of disability—and, its counterpart, ability—in nineteenth-century literary texts like Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. We will focus not only on the development of representations of disability, but also the development of the idea of disability in relation to the changing circumstances of impaired individuals in the long nineteenth century. We will also consider how disability is shaped by race, class, and gender and in relation to issues such as labor, politics, and sexuality.

Students in this class will complete two major assignments: 1) A five-page midterm paper analyzing one of the central texts in terms of the themes we are exploring together. These papers will be due at different points in the mid-semester for different students, as the perspectives introduced in them will help shape our group inquiry, and 2) an 8-10 page final research paper in which students will have the opportunity to pursue their own questions about the texts more fully. There will also be some smaller assignments aimed at helping student develop their ideas for the midterm.

Experiential in the Major

Title: ENGL 3340 – Technologies of Text

Instructor: Professor Ryan Cordell

CRN: 37343

Sequence: 3 (10:30-11:35AM MWR)

Attributes: Major Requirement Theories & Methods, Experiential Learning;  NUCore Math/Anly Think Lvl 2; NUpath EI, AD

Description: Every old media was once new media, including moveable type, the steam press, radio, film, television, the internet. Many of the debates that seem unique to the twenty-first century—over privacy, intellectual property, and textual authority—are but new iterations of familiar battles this course will trace through its history of new media. The course is also experiential, asking students to experiment making texts as well as reading them. In “humanities lab” sessions students will work with text technologies new and old: e.g. paper making, setting type and printing on a letterpress, encoding in HTML and CSS, or writing code to computationally analyze text. This course aims to help students understand texts in terms of technology, labor, design, and medium through practices of critical reading and critical making.

Title: ENGL 3382 – Publication Arts/Publishing in the 21st Century

Instructor: Professor Sebastian Stockman

CRN: 37344

Sequence: 4 (1:35-2:40PM MWR)

Attributes: Major Requirement Writing, Experiential Learning; NUCore Experiential Learning, Writing Intensive in the Major; NUpath WI

Description:

“Publishing in the 21st Century” offers students an investigative experience into publishing and writing. Students will explore a variety of questions, including but not limited to: What does it mean to be a publishing writer today? What does it mean to be a publisher today? How have technological advances and the social media craze changed the publishing industry?

As part of participating in an experiential-learning course, students will be required to attend local activities, such as readings, plays, lectures, and other community literacy events. Students will interview and profile a Boston-area writer or publisher to learn about the writing process, trends in the publishing field, and potential career paths. Students will compose and curate a class blog as a way to document and share their research and experiences. Finally, students will share their knowledge about writing through a collaboration with 826 Boston and our partner site, the Writers’ Room at the John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics & Science in Roxbury. Students will help younger writers develop and publish a book of their creative works. By the end of the course, students will have gained a better theoretical understanding of the art of publication, as well as practical experience with writing production and publication.

Capstone

Title: ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar: Sonnets and Skulls

Instructor: Professor Erika Boeckeler

CRN: 30549

Sequence: 4 (1:35-2:40PM MWR)

AttributesMajor Requirement Capstone; NUCore Capstone; NUpath WI, CE

Description: This class examines the relationship between writing and things. Writing is always a “thing” –it has to appear on or as some thing, right?—but how does that “thing” affect the writing on it, and vice versa? Of course, one of those “things” is a book, and we’ll spend some of this class thinking about books as things and about how other objects can help us to understand them. Our readings will be a mix of philosophical and theoretical texts about the nature of the material world and the human ability to know it, and of a wide variety of literary genres that showcase the materiality of language or the linguistic capabilities of objects, e.g. texts with inhuman narrators, writing on things like architecture, jewelry, clothing, sculpture, items for everyday household use, trees, crosses, the body, and, yes, skulls.

Title: ENGL 4720 – Capstone Project

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen

CRN: 37345

Sequence: D (9:50-11:30AM TF)

Attributes: Major Requirement Capstone; NUCore Capstone;  NUpath WI, CE

Description: Offers students an opportunity to design, develop, and complete a major intellectual project in a workshop setting. Students must enter this course with an approved project and the support of a faculty member in the relevant area of study. In addition to producing original research, offers students an opportunity to contextualize their work in relation to their focus within English studies, their experience of the major, and their intellectual and professional goals. Prereq. Completion of Advanced Writing in the Disciplines and senior standing; English majors and combined majors only.

Spring 2017 English Courses by NUCore, NUpath

NUCore

NUCore

Capstone

ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar: Sonnets and Skulls (see Capstone)
ENGL 4720 – Capstone Project (see Capstone)

Comparative Study of Cultures

ENGL 2460 – Multiethnic Literature of the US (see Comparative)

Experiential Learning

ENGL 3382 – Publication Arts/Publishing in the 21st Century (see Writing)

Humanities Level 1

ENGL 1700 – Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)
ENGL 1500 – British Literature to 1800 (see Comparative)

Math/Anly Think Lvl 2

ENGL 3340 – Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods)

Writing-Intensive in the Major

ENGL 1400 – Introduction to Literary Studies (see Foundational)
ENGL 1410 – Introduction to Writing Studies (see Foundational)
ENGL 3380 – Topics in Writing: Slam Poetry (see Writing)
ENGL 3382 – Publication Arts/Publishing in the 21st Century (see Writing)

NUpath

NUpath

AD = Analyzing and Using Data

ENGL 3340 – Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods)

CE = Demonstrating Thought and Action in a Capstone

ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar: Sonnets and Skulls (see Capstone)
ENGL 4720 – Capstone Project (see Capstone)

DD = Engaging Difference and Diversity

ENGL 1700 – Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)
ENGL 2460 – Multiethnic Literature of the US (see Comparative)

EI = Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation

ENGL 2710 – Style and Editing (see Writing)
ENGL 2850 – Writing and Social Media (see Writing)
ENGL 3340 – Technologies of Text (see Theories & Methods)
ENGL 3378 – Fiction Workshop (see Writing)
ENGL 3380 – Topics in Writing: Slam Poetry (see Writing)

EX = Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience

IC = Interpreting Culture

ENGL 1700 – Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)
ENGL 1500 – British Literature to 1800 (see Comparative)
ENGL 2460 – Multiethnic Literature of the US (see Comparative)
ENGL 2850 – Writing and Social Media (see Writing)

ND= Engaging with the Natural and Designed World

SI = Understanding Societies and Institutions

ENGL 1500 – British Literature to 1800 (see Comparative)

WI = Writing Intensive in the Major

ENGL 1400 – Introduction to Literary Studies (see Foundational)
ENGL 1410 – Introduction to Writing Studies (see Foundational)
ENGL 2710 – Style and Editing (see Writing)
ENGL 2850 – Writing and Social Media (see Writing)
ENGL 3380 – Topics in Writing: Slam Poetry (see Writing)
ENGL 3382 – Publication Arts/Publishing in the 21st Century (see Writing)
ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar: Sonnets and Skulls (see Capstone)
ENGL 4720 – Capstone Project (see Capstone)

Upcoming Course Offerings

Fall 2017 (subject to change)

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information and basic course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.

Foundational

  • ENGL 1160 – Introduction to Rhetoric
  • ENGL 1400 – Introduction to Literary Studies
  • ENGL 1700 – Global Literatures to 1500

Literary Periods – Early Literatures

  • ENGL 1600 – Introduction to Shakespeare
  • ENGL 4000 – Topics in Early Literatures: Greek Tragedy

Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries

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Literary Periods – 19th Century

  • ENGL 2260 – Romantic Poetry
  • ENGL 2330 – American Renaissance
  • ENGL 3720 – 19th C. Major Figure

Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries

  • ENGL 2440 – Modern Bestseller
  • ENGL 4060 – Topics in 20th/21st C. British Literatures: Irish Women Writers

Comparative

  • ENGL 1XXX – Make Me Laugh
  • ENGL 1XXX – What is Good Writing?
  • ENGL 1450 – Reading and Writing in the Digital Age
  • ENGL 1502 – American Literature to 1865
  • ENGL 2455 – American Women Writers
  • ENGL 2520 – Science Fiction

Theories and Methods

  • ENGL 4400 – Opening the Archive

Writing

  • ENGL 2700 – Creative Writing
  • ENGL 2760 – Writing in Global Contexts
  • ENGL 3380 – Topics in Writing: Slam Poetry

Diversity

  • ENGL 2455 – American Women Writers
  • ENGL 2760 – Writing in Global Contexts
  • ENGL 4060 – Topics in 20th/21st C. British Literatures: Irish Women Writers

Experiential in the Major

  • ENGL 4400 – Opening the Archive

Capstone

  • ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar: Victorian and Neo-Victorian Text
Spring 2018 (subject to change)

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information and basic course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.


Foundational

  • ENGL 1400 – Introduction to Literary Studies
  • ENGL 1410 – Introduction to Writing Studies
  • ENGL 1700  – Global Literature to 1500

Literary Periods – Early Literatures

  • ENGL 1600 – Introduction to Shakespeare
  • ENGL 4000 – Topics in Early Literatures

Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries

  • ENGL 2240 – 17th-Century British Literature

Literary Periods – 19th Century

  • ENGL 4040 – Topics in 19th-Century Literatures

Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries

  • ENGL 3685 – From Kafka to Kushner: Modern and Contemporary Jewish Literature

Comparative

  • ENGL 1XXX – Literature and Democracy
  • ENGL 1500 – British Literature to 1800
  • ENGL 2450 – Postcolonial Literature
  • ENGL 2510 – Horror Fiction

Theories and Methods

  • ENGL 3340 – Technologies of Text
  • ENGL 4410 – Research in Rhetoric and Writing

Writing

  • ENGL 2770 – Writing to Heal
  • ENGL 3377 – Poetry Workshop
  • ENGL 3378 – Fiction Workshop
  • ENGL 3382 – Publication Arts/Publishing in the 21st Century

Diversity

  • ENGL 2450 – Postcolonial Literature
  • ENGL 3685 – From Kafka to Kushner: Modern and Contemporary Jewish Literature

Experiential in the Major

  • ENGL 3340 – Technologies of Text
  • ENGL 3382 – Publication Arts/Publishing in the 21st Century

Capstone

  • ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar
  • ENGL 4720 – Capstone Project