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The 2014 Global Photo Contest Winner

CSSH Global Photography Contest 2015

Continuing with our 3rd  Annual Global Photo Contest, we continue to be impressed with our students’ incredible international experiences! We received photographs from students who have traveled all over the world through Northeastern’s study abroad, Dialogue of Civilizations, global co-op, and NUin programs. Below are the winners, as voted on by students, faculty, and staff during Welcome Week this fall. Come by our office in 180 Renaissance Park to see the rest of the finalists’ photos!

 

 

1st Place Winner: Hongliang Liu

Economics

Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China

Mystic Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car during a cloudy and foggy day

What is the significance of this photo to you?

It was lucky to experience a rainy and foggy day up there on the cable car, the mysterious fog blocked my vista and it seemed that the cable cars are taking us to Xanadu.

How did this photo and global experience allow you to see the world through a new lens?

Visiting new places are always exiting, especially when you are enjoying something that you’ve never saw before. Riding a cable car in such a foggy day is a unique experience and it probably will not happen a second time in my life.

 

 2nd Place Winner: Rose Leopold

Political Science

Mumbai, India

Potter's Village - Slums of Mumbai, India

 

What is the significance of this photo to you?

I really love this photo because of how happy these women look. The photo was taken in the slums of Mumbai, India where life is not always easy, yet these women were so proud to show off their craft to us. No amount of reading can prepare you for an actual trip to one of the world’s largest slums and I did not expect to see people who were so positive living there, so meeting these women was really heartwarming. Even though they have so little, they are able to brighten someone’s day with just a smile.

How did this photo and global experience allow you to see the world through a new lens?

Experiencing India through this Dialogue on climate change was incredibly eye opening for me. From the slums to the cities to the Himalayas, I was able to witness the impact of climate change firsthand. It changed my perspective on how to adapt to global climate change and showed me just how widespread the effects of climate change will be in every aspect of society. This experience led me to change the focus of my studies at Northeastern to want to spend more time on resiliency and climate change policy.

 3rd Place Winner: Alison Campbell

International Affairs/Political Science

Kigali, Rwanda

 

This is Mzee, which loosely translates to 'honourable old man' from Kinyarwanda. He kindly let me take his photograph one morning before work.

What is the significance of this photo to you?

This is a portrait of Mzee, which loosely translates to ‘honorable old man’ from Kinyarwanda. He works in the house I’m living in here in Kigali, and speaks little English, so the majority of our communication is through gesticulation, enthusiastic handshakes and foolish grins. He’s one of the warmest, most hardworking individuals I’ve met anyplace, and he was kind enough to let me photograph him one morning before work.

How did this photo and global experience allow you to see the world through a new lens?

I am in the definite minority here in Rwanda, and I don’t speak Kinyarwanda nor French, so my ability to communicate with most people here is limited to smiles, sporadic words and photographs. But from these [somewhat absurd] exchanges come handshakes, laughs, attempts to string together words in English and buttress our commonalities with sentences. It’s a really quiet, strange and beautiful sort of interaction, and it only happens I abandon the idea that my normalcy is universal and that my strangeness is a sufficient reason to not attempt to know people. And my desire for this sort of interaction is the driving force behind my attraction to portraiture; in taking portraits, people are able to clearly put forth the version of themselves they’d like to show me, and this has been huge in my experience here.

Honorable Mentions:

Rima Sheehab

Human Services

Livingstone, Zambia

Baboon overlooking Victoria Falls

What is the significance of this photo to you?

This photo is significant to me since it was my first experience at Victoria Falls, one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. It also expresses the awesomeness of being so close to African wildlife in the glory of their natural habitat. This moment had a spirituality to it that exemplifies the purity of Zambia & the original name of Victoria Falls, Mosi-oa-Tunya, which means “The Smoke that Thunders.”

 

How did this photo and global experience allow you to see the world through a new lens?

This photo, along with my dialogue to Zambia, opened my eyes to a place, culture, and people completely different from the US. While in Lusaka, Zambia, I worked at a nonprofit organization called Vision of Hope. At Vision, I became friends with and learned from the residents at the organization who were primarily vulnerable young girls and women who had overcome  extreme poverty and gender-based violence. I was able to view my own life and life experiences through a new lens and appreciate the small things that we take for granted, such as electricity, clean water, and easy access to reproductive healthcare.

Alexina Prather

Human Services

Kayamandi, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Stop Da Racism

What is the significance of this photo to you?

This photo was taken in the Kayamandi township, located outside of Stellenbosch, South Africa. This was a community that our group visited multiple times and was an extremely important part of our trip.

How did this photo and global experience allow you to see the world through a new lens?

This photo highlights the intense history of South Africa as a nation. It shows the country’s fight to ending racism and how the aftermath of the apartheid is still a part of the culture. This experience took me to places I had never been before and allowed me to experience many different cultures. It was an eye opening experience, one that I will never forget.

 

 

George Bekheet

Economics

Istanbul, Turkey

Lensman

What is the significance of this photo to you?

This photo is a representation of the individual. It was taken during sunset in an alleyway off of Istiklal street which leads to Gezi park where the famous Gezi protests were held. An individual has the strength to stir up revolution, the courage to oppose the unconventional, and loyalty to the community. Thousands of differently skilled members within the community came together to oppose destruction of the Gezi park. Photographers, doctors, lawyers, chefs, practically all occupations contributed to the cause. The power of the individual, at first sight may seem small, but when in sync with the community, it has the strength to produce radical change, just as those in the Gezi protests.

How did this photo and global experience allow you to see the world through a new lens?

The purpose of the dialogue was to study Muslim migration patterns from Istanbul to Berlin. Questions like: Whats the state of Turkey when the previously conservative, Muslim government is contested by the new, younger, secular generation? or in Kreuzberg, Berlin what are the social dynamics of this diverse, dynamic city although it contains several class fault lines? A learning experience that opened my eyes to the power of urban contestation. Although there may be disagreements within communities, it is a part of social and political evolution, leading to a brighter and successful future.  This photo represents where this dynamic begins, at the lowest level, the level of the individual.