Home » Undergraduate Course Offerings – FALL 2020

Undergraduate Course Offerings – FALL 2020

Fall 2020

Check out our Fall Course Handout to learn more about what NUPATH, major, and minor requirements these courses would fulfill!

1000 Level Courses

HIST 1000 - History at Northeastern

Title: HIST 1000 – History at Northeastern

Instructor: Timothy Brown

CRN: 14149

Sequence: Mondays, 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM

Description: Intended for first-year students in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Seeks to introduce first-year students to the liberal arts in general, to familiarize them with their history major, to provide grounding in the culture and values of the university community, and to help them develop interpersonal skills.

HIST 1130 - Introduction to the History of the United States

Title: HIST 1130 – Introduction to the History of the United States

Instructor: Gretchen Heefner

CRN: 10566

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Engages with the major issues in U.S. history. Topics include the interaction of native populations with European settlers, the American Revolution and the Constitution, slavery, the Civil War, industrialization and migration, the growth of government and rise of the welfare state, media and mass culture, struggles for civil rights and liberation, and America’s role in the world from independence to the Iraq wars. 

HIST 1150 - East Asian Studies

Title: HIST 1150 – East Asian Studies

Instructor: Tom Havens & Philip Thai

CRN: 13491 (Havens) / 18114 (Thai)

Sequence: 

Havens: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Thai: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Seeks to provide an understanding of the constituent characteristics that originally linked East Asia as a region and the nature of the transformations that have occurred in the region over the last two thousand years. Concentrates on China and Japan, and addresses Korea and Vietnam where possible. Also seeks to provide students with effective interdisciplinary analytical skills as well as historical, ethical, cultural diversity, and aesthetic perspectives. Cross-listed with ASNS 1150. 

 

HIST 1170 - Empires, Wars, & Revolutions

Title: HIST 1170 – Empires, Wars, & Revolutions

Instructor: Simon Rabinovitch

CRN: 13335

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Examines how empires, wars and revolutions have influenced the development of the modern world, focusing on Europe and Europe’s connections with the non-European world. Explores how wars and revolutions led to the emergence of modern concepts of sovereignty, the state, and citizenship and how global competition between states led to the emergence of empires. Traces the promise of allegedly liberating ideologies and the political and economic revolutions to which they led, repeated wars and their aftermaths, and the challenges of recent world developments viewed from the perspective of history. Explores how human diversity and difference have shaped modern societies through history and how human difference and multiculturalism have both fostered and posed challenges to civic sustainability. Interrogates the meanings of “modernity,” democracy and totalitarianism, capitalism and socialism, and globalization.

HIST 1185 - Introduction to Middle Eastern History

Title: HIST 1185 – Introduction to Middle Eastern History

Instructor: Ilham Khuri-Makdisi

CRN: 15572

Sequence: D (9:15 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Description: Relies on historical and literary sources, as well as such other cultural artifacts as architecture and photography, and focuses on interaction and changing relations and perceptions between Europe and the Middle East. Surveys the major political and economic events that have linked the trajectory of both civilizations, as well as broad patterns of human activity, such as migrations, conversions, and, cultural exchange. Emphasizes the commonality of encounters, and analyzes the construction of an “other” and its enduring legacy in modern times.

HIST 1200/1201 - First Year Research Seminar: History of Media

Title: HIST 1200/1201 – First Year Research Seminar

Instructor: Heather Streets-Salter

CRN: 12752 / 12347

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Provides an introduction to historical methods, research, writing, and argument in which all students produce a substantial research project that passes through at least two revisions, and that is presented publicly to other members of the colloquium. Topics will focus on the History of Media.

HIST 1206 - Drug Trade and Drug Wars: History, Security, Culture

Title: HIST 1206 – Drug Trade and Drug Wars

Instructor: Louise Walker

CRN: 18116

Sequence: 2 (9:15 AM – 10:20 AM MWR)

Description: Analyzes the role of drugs in world history. From the early use of stimulants such as coca and sugar to the “war on drugs” and narco-terrorism, the course examines drugs as commodities in the world economy. Focuses primarily on opiates, stimulants, and hallucinogens from the nineteenth century to the present, considering how changing social and cultural mores led different drugs to be coded as licit and illicit. Topics include traditional uses, early medical use, trade networks, prohibition, black market, and drug cultures, as well as the role of drugs in the histories of industrialization, imperialism, and cold war geopolitics. Sources include historical scholarship, declassified intelligence reports, documentaries, novels, movies, songs, and art.

HIST 1225 - Gender, Race, and Medicine

Title: HIST 1225 – Gender, Race, and Medicine

Instructor: Moya Bailey

CRN: 17785

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Examines the basic tenets of “scientific objectivity” and foundational scientific ideas about race, sex, and gender and what these have meant for marginalized groups in society, particularly when they seek medical care. Introduces feminist science theories ranging from linguistic metaphors of the immune system, to the medicalization of race, to critiques of the sexual binary. Emphasizes contemporary as well as historical moments to trace the evolution of “scientific truth” and its impact on the U.S. cultural landscape. Offers students an opportunity to develop the skills to critically question what they “know” about science and the scientific process and revisit their disciplinary training as a site for critical analysis. AFAM 1225, HIST 1225, and WMNS 1225 are cross-listed.

HIST 1252 - Japanese Literature and Culture

Title: HIST 1252 – Japanese Literature and Culture

Instructor: Tom Havens

CRN: 18117

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Explores major works of Japanese fiction and poetry in historical and cultural context. All readings are in English translation.

HIST 1272 - Europe in the Middle Ages

Title: HIST 1272 – Europe in the Middle Ages

Instructor: Robert Cross

CRN: 18118

Sequence: 2 (9:15 AM – 10:20 AM MWR)

Description: Examines the history of medieval Europe in a period of tremendous fluidity, migration, and flux. Studies the experiences of men and women in European societies before clearly defined nation-states had emerged. Topics include forms of political and cultural integration; the contacts between Europeans and non-Europeans in the Mediterranean and beyond; and the place of religion, art, and ideology, with attention to how Europeans’ experiences varied according to their gender, class, and race.

HIST 1286 - History of the Soviet Union

Title: HIST 1286 – History of the Soviet Union

Instructor: Peter Fraunholtz

CRN: 18290

Sequence: ONLINE

Description: Examines Russia and the Soviet Union in the 20th century focusing on empires and revolutions: the Russian empire’s dissolution, the Russian Revolution and civil war, building the Soviet Union, World War II, the cold war and Soviet expansion in Eastern Europe and Asia, the breakup of the Soviet Union and its newly independent states, and Russian efforts to maintain influence in the post-Soviet space. Assesses the construction of Soviet identity by interpreting Soviet culture in the form of film, literature, art, and music. Evaluates explanatory theories of revolution and empire and the evolution of Marxism in the context of revolution and state building.

HIST 1300 - Introduction to Health and Humanities

Title: HIST 1300 – Introduction to Health and Humanities

Instructor: Sari Altschuler

CRN: 18277

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MW)

Description: Explores the ways in which narrative and other forms of creative and cultural expression help shape conceptions of illness, healing, and the body. Offers students opportunities to consider the health and humanities through a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives and genres. Includes small-group and classwide experiential field outings. Culminates in the composition of reflective responses, a medical ethics/medical journalism piece, and a team-based experiential e-portfolio project. Course objectives include differentiating between healing and curing; knowing how to elicit, listen to, and analyze stories to determine how participants in the healthcare system experience illness and healing; being able to articulate the ways health is a cultural construct; and using this analysis to identify an empathic response as a future professional.

HIST 1390 - History of Espionage 2: Cold War Spies

Title: HIST 1390 – History of Espionage 2: Cold War Spies

Instructor: Jeffrey Burds

CRN: 15573

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM M)

Description: Explores the history of espionage during the Cold War era (1943–1991) through a series of case studies. Draws from a wide variety of published and unpublished primary and secondary sources, supplemented by modern theoretical and social science perspectives, literature, and films. Students work individually and in teams to explore the history of covert operations, including the following subthemes: the origins of the Cold War in World War II, the postwar battle for German scientists, containment and rollback, Venona and code breaking, nuclear spies, defectors, proxy wars, insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, terrorism, and technology.

2000 Level Courses

HIST 2000 - Native American Resistance: Past and Present

Title: HIST 2000 – Native American Resistance: Past and Present

Instructor: Nick Brown

CRN: 14665

Sequence: D (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM)

Description: Introduces the Indigenous peoples of North America and the academic field of Native American and Indigenous studies. Combines public history and public art, field trips, and original research to focus on the ongoing resistance to colonization and erasure and the resilience of Indian nations in New England and beyond. Covers particular themes, including the present-day impact of historical treaties and policies including land allotment, relocation, termination, boarding schools, and natural resource extraction.

HIST 2211 - The World Since 1945

Title: HIST 2211 – The World Since 1945

Instructors: Katherine Luongo & Peter Fraunholtz

CRN:  13014 (Luongo) / 11446 (Fraunholtz)

Sequence:

Luongo – 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Fraunholtz – ONLINE

Description: Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine.

 

HIST 2282 - The Holocaust and Comparative Genocide

Title: HIST 2282 – The Holocaust and Comparative Genocide

Instructor: Natalie Bormann

CRN: 18137

Sequence: E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Description: Examines the origins of the Holocaust, perpetrators and victims, and changing efforts to come to terms with this genocide. The Holocaust, the murder of six million Jews by Germans in Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II, is one of the crucial events of modern history. Investigates the uniqueness of the Holocaust relative to other acts of ethnic cleansing or genocide, including mass death in the New World and mass murder in Armenia, Bosnia, and Rwanda. HIST 2282 and POLS 2282 are cross-listed.

HIST 2301/2302 - 2nd Year History Seminar: Civil Wars, Insurgencies, and Violent Non-State Actors in World History

Title: HIST 2301/2302 – 2nd Year History Seminar

Instructor: Katherine Luongo

CRN: 10563 / 10476

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Introduces history majors to advanced techniques of historical practice in research and writing. Offers students an opportunity to conduct original research and write an original research paper. Seminar themes vary; students should check with the Department of History for a list of each year’s seminar offerings. Focusing on the topic of Civil Wars, Insurgencies, and Violent Non-State Actors in World History.

HIST 2303 - Gender and Reproductive Justice

Title: HIST 2303 – Gender and Reproductive Justice

Instructor: Margot Abels

CRN: 18133

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Introduces the social, legal, and economic barriers to accessing reproductive healthcare domestically and internationally. Draws on various theoretical and analytic tools including critical race theory, critical legal theory, sociology of science, human rights, feminist theory, and a range of public health methods. Access to reproductive health services, including abortion, is one of the most contested political, social, cultural, and religious issues today. Covers domestic, regional, and international legal and regulatory frameworks on sexual reproductive health. HIST 2303, SOCL 2303, and WMNS 2303 are cross-listed.

HIST 2311 - Colonialism / Imperialism

Title: HIST 2311 – Colonialism / Imperialism

Instructor: Heather Streets-Salter

CRN: 15574

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Examines the military, economic, political, and cultural expansion of world powers since the fifteenth century, and the ways in which colonized peoples were ruled. Why did colonialist countries feel the need to conquer and dominate, how did they do it, and why did they retreat on some fronts? How did people resist and cooperate with colonialism? How did colonialism affect national and cultural identities? Colonialism is examined as a global phenomenon and from a comparative perspective that looks at particular case studies. Also examines decolonization in the twentieth century.

HIST 2332 - The United States, 1900 - 1945: Politics, Culture, and Globalism

Title: HIST 2332 – The United States, 1900 – 1945: Politics, Culture, and Globalism

Instructor: Richard Freeland

CRN: 18120

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Explores the history of the United States during the first half of the 20th century, during which the country was transformed from an agrarian to an industrial economy and from a secondary power to global dominance. Central themes include the national government’s multiple attempts to create policies, laws, and regulations consistent with maintaining social order, economic stability, and widely shared prosperity under the new economic conditions; the efforts of the United States to establish a world economic and political order in which a capitalist democracy could flourish; and the social, cultural, and political dimensions of the changing experiences of the American people. Topics include the Progressive Era (1900–1919); the 1920s; the Great Depression and the New Deal; and World War II.

HIST 2370 - Renaissance to Enlightenment

Title: HIST 2370 – Renaissance to Enlightenment

Instructor: Robert Cross

CRN: 15576

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Covers the social, economic, political, and cultural transformations of Europe from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. Traces the rebirth of Catholic Europe from 1300; the Reformation; the religious wars; struggles over religious and scientific beliefs; advances in technology, science, and warfare; overseas expansion; the scientific revolution; and the Enlightenment.

HIST 2431 - Immigration and Identity in the American Jewish Experience

Title: HIST 2431 – Immigration and Identity in the American Jewish Experience

Instructor: Simon Rabinovitch

CRN: 18121

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Examines Jewish political, social, and cultural history from the arrival of the first group of Jews at New Amsterdam in 1654 to the present. Themes include immigration, adaptation, family life, religion, anti-Semitism, Zionism, the Holocaust, and American-Israeli relations. HIST 2431 and JWSS 2431 are cross-listed.

3000 Level Courses

HIST 3330 - The Global Cold War

Title: HIST 3330 – The Global Cold War

Instructor:  Philip Thai

CRN: 18122

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Examines the Cold War, emphasizing how the Soviet-American struggle for global preeminence intersected with decolonization and the rise of the “Third World.” Uses primary sources, monographs, and scholarly articles to trace the major events and developments of the Cold War—ideological differences between the capitalist and socialist systems, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the construction of the Berlin Wall, the Vietnam War—while also exploring how and why the Cold War came to pervade economic, cultural, and social relations globally. Examines how unexpected actors—Cuban doctors and Peace Corps volunteers—responded to and shaped superpower rivalry. Considers how the Cold War continues to shape the world today.

HIST 3334 - Assassinations in World History

Title: HIST 3334 – Assassinations in World History

Instructor: Jeffrey Burds

CRN: 18123

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Explores the historical antecedents to the unprecedented use of assassination and targeted killing as state policy in the current war on terror: the theory, strategic use, ethics, and legality of assassination. Using film, literature, and primary and secondary readings, explores case studies in the world history of assassination, from ancient times to the current day, including case studies from the Roman Empire, early modern Europe, revolutionary Europe, and the 20th century.

HIST 3350 - Leaders and Leadership in History

Title: HIST 3350 – Leaders and Leadership in History

Instructor: Louise Walker

CRN: TBD

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Forthcoming

4000 Level Courses

HIST 4701 - Capstone: History of Middle East / US Relations in the Modern Era

Title: HIST 4701 – Capstone

Instructor: Ilham Khuri-Makdisi

CRN: 10564

Sequence: F (1:35 PM – 3:15 PM TF)

Description: Offers students an opportunity to make use of advanced techniques of historical methodology to conduct original research and write a major, original research paper as the culmination of their work toward the history degree. This is a capstone research and writing seminar for history majors. Topics will focus on History of Middle East / US Relations in the Modern Era.