Home » Undergraduate Course Offerings – SPRING 2020

Undergraduate Course Offerings – SPRING 2020

Spring 2020

Check out our Spring Course Handout to learn more about what NUPATH, major, and minor requirements these courses would fulfill!

1000 Level Courses

HIST 1130 - Introduction to the History of the United States

Title: HIST 1130 – Introduction to the History of the United States

Instructor: Cameron Blevins

CRN: 34277

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Engages with the major issues in U.S. history. Topics include the interaction of native populations with European settlers, the American Revolution and the Constitution, slavery, the Civil War, industrialization and migration, the growth of government and rise of the welfare state, media and mass culture, struggles for civil rights and liberation, and America’s role in the world from independence to the Iraq wars. 

HIST 1150 - East Asian Studies

Title: HIST 1150 – East Asian Studies

Instructor: Tom Havens

CRN: 32495

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Seeks to provide an understanding of the constituent characteristics that originally linked East Asia as a region and the nature of the transformations that have occurred in the region over the last two thousand years. Concentrates on China and Japan, and addresses Korea and Vietnam where possible. Also seeks to provide students with effective interdisciplinary analytical skills as well as historical, ethical, cultural diversity, and aesthetic perspectives. Cross-listed with ASNS 1150. 

 

HIST 1218 - Pirates, Planters, and Patriots: Making the Americas, 1492 - 1804

Title: HIST 1218 – Pirates, Planters, and Patriots: Making the Americas, 1492 – 1804

Instructor: Christopher Parsons

CRN: 38028

Sequence: 2 (9:15 AM – 10:20 AM MWR)

Description: Seeks to challenge students to understand more than the outlines of American history—Pilgrims, patriots, plantations— in the broader contexts of events that unfolded in and around the Atlantic Ocean in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. Covers Columbus’s first landing in the Caribbean to the Haitian declaration of independence in 1804 and includes the Atlantic trade, piracy, slavery and other forms of labor, cultural and ecological exchange, and independence and emancipation.

HIST 1246 - World War II in the Pacific

Title: HIST 1246 – World War II in the Pacific

Instructor:  Tom Havens

CRN: 33687

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MW)

Description: Studies World War II, the most devastating war in history, which began in Asia and had a great long-term impact there. Using historical and literary texts, examines the causes, decisive battles, and lingering significance of the conflict on both sides of the Pacific.

HIST 1286 - History of the Soviet Union

Title: HIST 1286 – History of the Soviet Union

Instructor: Simon Rabinovitch

CRN: 38049

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Surveys social, political, economic, demographic, and cultural developments in the former Soviet Union since 1917: the legacies of war and revolution, the civil war between the communists and the anti-communists, famine, the New Economic Policy, competing perspectives on the new regime, the rise of Stalin, the Cultural Revolution, collectivization and industrialization, the Purges, World War II and its impact, the “two camps” and the origins of the Cold War, the Soviet Union and the new East European system, Khrushchev, destalinization, intellectuals and the “thaw,” the Cuban missile crisis, the demise of Khrushchev, Brezhnev and the period of stagnation, the Gorbachev Revolution, Yeltsin, nationalism, and the dissolution.

HIST 1290 - Modern Middle East

Title: HIST 1290 – Modern Middle East

Instructor: Ilham Khuri-Makdisi

CRN: 37168

Sequence: D (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Description: Examines the political, social, and cultural history of the Arab countries of the modern Middle East, as well as Iran, Israel, and Turkey. Covers the period from the early 19th century through the late 20th century. Offers students an opportunity to obtain a basis for understanding the politics, social movements, and cultural expressions of the region in the late 20th century. Major themes include imperialism and colonialism; the creation and transformation of the modern states and their political systems since World War I; the transformation of Middle Eastern societies during this same period under the impact of colonialism, independence, regional wars, and oil; women’s and labor movements; and revolutions. Uses a variety of sources including memoirs, photography, literature, and political speeches.

HIST 1297 - Reformers, Tribes, Saints: North Africa in World History, 1500 - Present

Title: HIST 1297 – Reformers, Tribes, Saints: North Africa in World History, 1500 – Present

Instructor: Peter Fraunholtz

CRN: 308025

Sequence: ONLINE

Description: Covers North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) and its emergence as a key arena in the spread of the global economy, the struggle for human rights and gender equality, the emergence of civil society, and the struggle between moderate and militant forms of political Islam. Analyzes these recent challenges in the context of centuries of authoritarian tribal-based rule, religious reform movements, and popular efforts to withstand considerable foreign political and economic pressure from Europe and beyond. While sultans “ruled” the region for centuries, they did so in varying degrees with the assistance of or under pressure from reformers, tribes, and saints, both moderate and militant. Uses a variety of sources and media to investigate how these factors shape ongoing postcolonial political, social, and economic development.

HIST 1389 - History of Espinage 1: Antiquity to World War II

Title: HIST 1389 – History of Espinage 1: Antiquity to World War II

Instructor: Jeff Burds

CRN: 34248

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Explores the history of espionage through a series of case studies from ancient Rome, Greece, and China; the Reformation; the Age of Discovery; the French Revolution; the American Civil War; World War I and the Russian Revolution; and World War II. Commonly referred to as the world’s “second oldest profession,” espionage is an intrinsic part of the relationships between communities, institutions, and states. Draws from a wide variety of published and unpublished primary and secondary sources, supplemented by modern theoretical and social science perspectives, literature, and films.

2000 Level Courses

HIST 2211 - The World Since 1945

Title: HIST 2211 – The World Since 1945

Instructors: Allison Chapin, Peter Fraunholtz, Katherine Luongo, and Malcolm Purinton

CRN:   38046 (Chapin) /  32452 (Fraunholtz) / 38050 (Luongo) / 33972 (Purinton)

Sequence:

Chapin – Sequence D (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Fraunholtz – ONLINE

Luongo – Sequence 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Purinton – Sequence A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

 

Description: Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine.

 

HIST 2301/2302 - The Global 60's: 2nd Year History Seminar

Title: HIST 2301/2302 – The Global 60’s: 2nd Year History Seminar

Instructor: Timothy Brown

CRN: 30414 / 30413

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Introduces history majors to advanced techniques of historical practice in research and writing. Offers students an opportunity to conduct original research and write an original research paper. Seminar themes vary; students should check with the Department of History for a list of each year’s seminar offerings.

HIST 2311 - Colonialism / Imperialism

Title: HIST 2311 – Colonialism / Imperialism

Instructor: Luke Scalone

CRN: 38029

Sequence: E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Description: Examines the military, economic, political, and cultural expansion of world powers since the fifteenth century, and the ways in which colonized peoples were ruled. Why did colonialist countries feel the need to conquer and dominate, how did they do it, and why did they retreat on some fronts? How did people resist and cooperate with colonialism? How did colonialism affect national and cultural identities? Colonialism is examined as a global phenomenon and from a comparative perspective that looks at particular case studies. Also examines decolonization in the twentieth century.

HIST 2373 - Gender and Sexuality in World History

Title: HIST 2373 – Gender and Sexuality in World History

Instructor: Jack Gronau

CRN: 38012

Sequence: F (1:35 PM – 3:15 PM TF)

Description: Introduces key concepts in the fields of gender and identity studies as they apply to world history since about 1800. Offers students an opportunity to understand the critical significance of gender, sex, sexuality, and identity to world events and how these contentious subjects influence the contemporary world. Surveys a series of major movements in geopolitics, labor, economics, culture, and society in order to analyze how individual and group identities, as well as mass assumptions about behavior and performance, have shaped these events. Gender, sex, and sexuality are integral to class discussions of work, welfare, art, culture, violence, war, and activism. HIST 2373 and WMNS 2373 are cross-listed.

HIST 2375 - The Tudors, the Stuarts, and the Birth of Modern Britain

Title: HIST 2375 – The Tudors, the Stuarts, and the Birth of Modern Britain

Instructor: Robert Cross

CRN: 38047

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Examines the history of early modern England as well as Ireland, Wales, and Scotland. Follows the development of England from a small backwater to one of the most powerful European nations by the end of the seventeenth century. Analyzes the constantly shifting relationships between the various cultural identities within Britain. Concentrates on British history not only from the perspective of the elites but also the ordinary people whose names have often been lost to history. Key themes include the growth of the British Empire, issues of gender, the interactions between England and the Celtic fringes, and participation in the political franchise.

3000 Level Courses

HIST 3334 - Assassinations in World History

Title: HIST 3334 – Assassinations in World History

Instructor: Jeffrey Burds

CRN: 35182

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MR)

Description: Explores the historical antecedents to the unprecedented use of assassination and targeted killing as state policy in the current war on terror: the theory, strategic use, ethics, and legality of assassination. Using film, literature, and primary and secondary readings, explores case studies in the world history of assassination, from ancient times to the current day, including case studies from the Roman Empire, early modern Europe, revolutionary Europe, and the 20th century.

4000 Level Courses

HIST 4701 - Capstone

Title: HIST 4701 – Capstone

Instructors: Gretchen Heefner

CRN: 35958

Sequence: D (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Description: Offers students an opportunity to make use of advanced techniques of historical methodology to conduct original research and write a major, original research paper as the culmination of their work toward the history degree. This is a capstone research and writing seminar for history majors.