Home » Undergraduate Course Offerings – SUMMER 2020

Undergraduate Course Offerings – SUMMER 2020

Summer 2020

Check out our Summer Course Handout to learn more about what NUPATH, major, and minor requirements these courses would fulfill!

Summer Session One

HIST 1130 - Introduction to the History of the United States

Title: HIST 1130 – Introduction to the History of the United States

Instructors: James Robinson

CRN: 41299

Sequence: 2 (MTWR 9:50 AM – 11:30 AM)

Description: Engages with the major issues in U.S. history. Topics include the interaction of native populations with European settlers, the American Revolution and the Constitution, slavery, the Civil War, industrialization and migration, the growth of government and rise of the welfare state, media and mass culture, struggles for civil rights and liberation, and America’s role in the world from independence to the Iraq wars.

 

HIST 1215 - Origins of Today: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

Title: HIST 1215 – Origins of Today: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

Instructors: Luke Scalone

CRN: 41508

Sequence: Online

Description: Focuses on the historical roots of four pressing contemporary issues with global implications. Our world has grown increasingly complex and interconnected, and the planet’s diverse peoples are facing common problems that have tremendous impact on the immediate future. They are (1) globalization, from its origins in the sixteenth century to the present; (2) the potential for global pandemics to alter the course of history, from bubonic plague in the fifth century to H1N1; (3) racial inequality, from religious interpretations in the early modern period to science in the modern era; and (4) gender inequality, from the agricultural revolution forward. For each issue, studies cases and locations spread across the world, examines the links between past and present, and attempts to identify ways forward. 

 

HIST 1390 - History of Espionage 2: Cold War Spies

Title: HIST 1390 – History of Espionage 2: Cold War Spies

Instructor: Jeff Burds

CRN: 41058

Sequence: 5 (11:40 AM – 1:20 PM MTWR)

Description: Explores the history of espionage during the Cold War era (1943–1991) through a series of case studies. Draws from a wide variety of published and unpublished primary and secondary sources, supplemented by modern theoretical and social science perspectives, literature, and films. Students work individually and in teams to explore the history of covert operations, including the following subthemes: the origins of the Cold War in World War II, the postwar battle for German scientists, containment and rollback, Venona and code breaking, nuclear spies, defectors, proxy wars, insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, terrorism, and technology. 

HIST 2217 - The Global Far-Right since 1945: Politics, Culture, Violence

Title: HIST 2217 – The Global Far-Right since 1945: Politics, Culture, Violence

Instructors: Simon Purdue

CRN: 41300

Sequence: 3 (1:30 PM – 3:10 PM MTWR)

Description: Explores the emergence of far-right activism globally since the end of World War II. Emphasizes how radical far-right ideology developed and shifted over the course of the last 75 years by focusing on how it globalized through written culture, music, and the internet. Examines a number of case studies in which far-right cultures developed and then spread, which can include South Africa, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Russia, as well as related movements such as radical Hindu nationalism and Hindutva. Explores each case study in terms of culture, politics, and ideologies of violence.

 

HIST 2311 - Colonialism / Imperialism

Title: HIST 2311 – Colonialism / Imperialism

Instructors: Katherine Luongo

CRN: 40643

Sequence: Online

Description: Examines the military, economic, political, and cultural expansion of world powers since the fifteenth century, and the ways in which colonized peoples were ruled. Why did colonialist countries feel the need to conquer and dominate, how did they do it, and why did they retreat on some fronts? How did people resist and cooperate with colonialism? How did colonialism affect national and cultural identities? Colonialism is examined as a global phenomenon and from a comparative perspective that looks at particular case studies. Also examines decolonization in the twentieth century.

 

Summer Session 2

HIST 1215 - Origins of Today: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

Title: HIST 1215 – Origins of Today: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

Instructors: Allison Chapin

CRN: 61241

Sequence: Online

Description: Focuses on the historical roots of four pressing contemporary issues with global implications. Our world has grown increasingly complex and interconnected, and the planet’s diverse peoples are facing common problems that have tremendous impact on the immediate future. They are (1) globalization, from its origins in the sixteenth century to the present; (2) the potential for global pandemics to alter the course of history, from bubonic plague in the fifth century to H1N1; (3) racial inequality, from religious interpretations in the early modern period to science in the modern era; and (4) gender inequality, from the agricultural revolution forward. For each issue, studies cases and locations spread across the world, examines the links between past and present, and attempts to identify ways forward.

 

HIST 2211 - The World Since 1945

Title: HIST 2211 – The World Since 1945

Instructor:  Peter Fraunholtz 

CRN: 60186 and 61188 (note there are two sections available)

Sequence: Online

Description: Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine.

 

HIST 2280 - Hitler, Germany, and the Holocaust

Title: HIST 2280 – Hitler, Germany, and the Holocaust

Instructor: Will Whitworth

CRN: 60993

Sequence: 2 (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM MTWR)

Description: Studies historical developments from Germany’s defeat in World War I to the end of World War II. Topics include the failure of Weimar democracy; Weimar culture; the rise to power of Hitler and National Socialism; Nazi culture and racial wars against alleged “degenerates”; the roles of party leaders, business and cultural elites, and ordinary Germans in supporting and legitimizing the Nazi dictatorship.