Undergraduate Course Offerings – SUMMER 2019

Summer 2019

Summer Session One

HIST 1215 - Origins of Today: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

Title: HIST 1215 – Origins of Today: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

Instructors: Heather Streets-Salter

CRN: 40822

Sequence: Online

Description: Focuses on the historical roots of four pressing contemporary issues with global implications. Our world has grown increasingly complex and interconnected, and the planet’s diverse peoples are facing common problems that have tremendous impact on the immediate future. They are (1) globalization, from its origins in the sixteenth century to the present; (2) the potential for global pandemics to alter the course of history, from bubonic plague in the fifth century to H1N1; (3) racial inequality, from religious interpretations in the early modern period to science in the modern era; and (4) gender inequality, from the agricultural revolution forward. For each issue, studies cases and locations spread across the world, examines the links between past and present, and attempts to identify ways forward. 

 

HIST 1390 - History of Espionage 2: Cold War Spies

Title: HIST 1390 – History of Espionage 2: Cold War Spies

Instructor: Jeff Burds

CRN: 41456

Sequence: 5 (11:40 AM – 1:20 PM MTWR)

Description: Explores the history of espionage during the Cold War era (1943–1991) through a series of case studies. Draws from a wide variety of published and unpublished primary and secondary sources, supplemented by modern theoretical and social science perspectives, literature, and films. Students work individually and in teams to explore the history of covert operations, including the following subthemes: the origins of the Cold War in World War II, the postwar battle for German scientists, containment and rollback, Venona and code breaking, nuclear spies, defectors, proxy wars, insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, terrorism, and technology. 

HIST 2025 - Latin American History through Film

Title: HIST 2025 – Latin American History through Film

Instructors: Louise Walker

CRN: 40822

Sequence: A (8:00 AM – 11:30 AM MW)

Description:Uses films to analyze major questions in Latin American history. Topics include conquest, slavery, and revolution. The films are works of fiction, but most of them relate to real events. Course readings include “traditional” primary sources about the events (such as letters and espionage reports). Studies the history represented in the films and the assumptions and ideological perspectives and how these are conveyed through narrative and visual techniques. More broadly, considers how history is presented and represented by different sources. Offers students an opportunity to obtain a deeper appreciation for the complexity of Latin America. 

 

HIST 2211 - The World Since 1945

Title: HIST 2211 – The World Since 1945

Instructors: Malcolm Purinton

CRN: 40315

Sequence: 2 (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM MTWR)

Description: Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine.

 

HIST 2311 - Colonialism / Imperialism

Title: HIST 2311 – Colonialism / Imperialism

Instructors: Matt Bowser

CRN: 40822

Sequence: 3 (1:30 PM – 3:10 PM MTWR)

Description: Examines the military, economic, political, and cultural expansion of world powers since the fifteenth century, and the ways in which colonized peoples were ruled. Why did colonialist countries feel the need to conquer and dominate, how did they do it, and why did they retreat on some fronts? How did people resist and cooperate with colonialism? How did colonialism affect national and cultural identities? Colonialism is examined as a global phenomenon and from a comparative perspective that looks at particular case studies. Also examines decolonization in the twentieth century.

 

Summer Session 2

HIST 1215 - Origins of Today: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

Title: HIST 1215 – Origins of Today: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

Instructors: James Robinson

CRN: 61185

Sequence: Online

Description: Focuses on the historical roots of four pressing contemporary issues with global implications. Our world has grown increasingly complex and interconnected, and the planet’s diverse peoples are facing common problems that have tremendous impact on the immediate future. They are (1) globalization, from its origins in the sixteenth century to the present; (2) the potential for global pandemics to alter the course of history, from bubonic plague in the fifth century to H1N1; (3) racial inequality, from religious interpretations in the early modern period to science in the modern era; and (4) gender inequality, from the agricultural revolution forward. For each issue, studies cases and locations spread across the world, examines the links between past and present, and attempts to identify ways forward.

 

HIST 1286 - History of the Soviet Union

Title: HIST 1286 – History of the Soviet Union

Instructor: Jeff Burds

CRN: 60994

Sequence: 5 (11:40 AM – 1:20 PM MTWR)

Description: Surveys social, political, economic, demographic, and cultural developments in the former Soviet Union since 1917: the legacies of war and revolution, the civil war between the communists and the anti-communists, famine, the New Economic Policy, competing perspectives on the new regime, the rise of Stalin, the Cultural Revolution, collectivization and industrialization, the Purges, World War II and its impact, the “two camps” and the origins of the Cold War, the Soviet Union and the new East European system, Khrushchev, destalinization, intellectuals and the “thaw,” the Cuban missile crisis, the demise of Khrushchev, Brezhnev and the period of stagnation, the Gorbachev Revolution, Yeltsin, nationalism, and the dissolution.

HIST 2211 - The World Since 1945

Title: HIST 2211 – The World Since 1945

Instructor:  Peter Fraunholtz 

CRN: 60186 and 61188 (note there are two sections available)

Sequence: Online

Description: Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine.

 

HIST 2376 - Britain and the British Empire

Title: HIST 2376 – Britain and the British Empire

Instructor: Jamie Parker

CRN: 60993

Sequence: 3 (1:30 PM – 3:10 PM MTWR)

Description:Traces the rise of Britain as a major colonial power and its transformation after the end of empire. Explores the interrelationships between metropole and colonies through sustained attention to critical race, feminist, and socioeconomic frameworks. Units include colonial violence, settler colonialism, anticolonial resistance, decolonization, multicultural Britain in the postcolonial era, and relations with the European Union.