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‘How do we break the supply chain’ to disrupt human trafficking in U.S. agriculture?

Imagine, says Northeastern assistant professor Shawn Bhimani, the plight of a migrant worker who cannot find work.

“Come work for me,” a prospective employer says to the worker. “I’ll pay you $14 an hour.”

So begins an ugly cycle of exploitation. The worker is transported to a farm, where her actual salary is reduced to, say, $8 per hour. Then she learns that most or all of her salary is being seized by the employer to pay for her airfare as well as her rent. And she worries about complaining to law enforcement because her employer has confiscated her passport.

This is one of the many scenarios that three Northeastern professors will be researching as part of an investigation of human trafficking in U.S. agriculture. They intend to map and evaluate the human supply chains to determine the key areas of vulnerability, with the goal of engineering ways to disrupt those trafficking systems, over the course of a three-year study. They hope to create models of disruption that can be applied to other sectors of human trafficking, which is estimated to victimize more than 24 million people worldwide.

Read the full story on News@Northeastern.

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