Skip to content
Connect
Stories

How the Jim Crow South encouraged racial policing by those with ‘no legal authority’

People in this story

Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University
Margaret Burnham - By Hands Now Known

If a Black person wanted to ride a public bus in the Jim Crow-era South, they would have to climb into the front of the bus to pay, then exit the bus and walk to the rear entrance. Segregation, codified under the South’s so-called Jim Crow laws, meant that Black passengers couldn’t even walk through the white section at the front of the bus. And the white bus driver making sure passengers used the correct entrance? He might very well be carrying a firearm.

“Jim Crow was the legal system of the Southern states for at least 60 years. Jim Crow was the law,” says Northeastern University Distinguished Professor of Law Margaret Burnham.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

More Stories

ADVANCE FOR MONDAY AUG. 22 - In this Aug. 5, 2016 photo, Movie reels and old films left over from the Old Texas Theater's years as a movie house sit on display in a cabinet within the Ballinger venue in Ballinger, Texas. Things have been up and down for the Old Texas Theater over the years. Now, the venue is coming back once again.

Northeastern professor uncovers oldest Japanese American film

09.28.2022
Britain's King Charles III leaves after attending the state funeral of Queen Elizabeth II, at the Westminster Abbey in London Monday, Sept. 19, 2022.

Why the UK needs the realms and the Commonwealth much more than they need the UK

09.23.2022
Rally in Lisbon in rejection of Masha Amini's death - 23 Sept 2022

Protests raging across Iran show ‘solidarity’ and anger against regime, Northeastern experts say

09.28.22
News@Northeastern