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Creating Beautiful, Just, and Resilient Places in America

Conducted in partnership with The Bruner Foundation, the Spring 2021 Myra Kraft Open Classroom (MKOC) will be entirely remote. There will be no in-person MKOC events for the spring semester.

IMPORTANT REGISTRATION INFORMATION: The Zoom Webinar information is the same every week. Once you register, you will immediately receive the Zoom link, as well as an additional reminder one hour prior to each panel. If you have already registered for a previous week, you do not need to register again.

When: Wednesdays, Spring Semester
Time: 6 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST


Course Facilitator
Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Synopsis

Design is everywhere.

It has become clear that the events of 2020 will have deep and lasting consequences for every aspect of society including the physical environments we inhabit—our homes, our neighborhoods, and our cities. What can we learn from previous experience that can be applied to current challenges and future efforts in Boston and other cities and towns in America?

Join us as we go on the road with the Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence with some of America’s best thinkers on urban design to visit, discuss, and learn from award-winning places and people engaged in innovative urban design. We’ll hear from leading voices in architecture and urban design, planning and development, education and community engagement, and public policy and civic leadership.

Over the course of this 12-week lecture series, we’ll explore how people and cities across The United States are tackling tough challenges like: expanding affordable housing, addressing the impacts of climate change, fostering entrepreneurship and innovation, fighting socioeconomic disparity, improving public education, investing in public spaces, leveraging arts and culture, and providing access to healthy food. We’ll consider how we can apply these ideas as we plan for the future in Boston and other cities.

IMPORTANT: These events will take place via Zoom Webinar and will be recorded. We have a 500-person limit, so if you are unable to join, please utilize our livestream on Facebook Live.

Featuring Karilyn Crockett, Chief of Equity for the City of Boston

How do we create beautiful, just, and resilient places? We’ll kick off the Spring 2021 series with a conversation with Dr. Karilyn Crockett, the City of Boston’s first Chief of Equity. We’ll discuss strategies for embedding equity into urban planning and development in Boston and other cities. We’ll consider observations and lessons learned from her research and book People Before Highways: Boston Activists, Urban Planners, and a New Movement for City Making, which chronicles the 1960s era grassroots movement that halted the construction of I-95 through the City of Boston and had a lasting impact on geographic and political change in the city. The initiative led to the creation of Southwest Corridor Project (1989 RBA Silver Medalist), the expansion of public transit and creation of a new greenway connecting neighborhoods with downtown.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and describe approaches to addressing equity in cities.
  • Understand and describe how inclusive planning processes and development projects can address community welfare and affect economic, environmental, and social change.
  • Discuss the value of engaging in collaborative partnerships in the planning, design, and development of inclusive, community-based projects.
  • Identify and describe the lasting impacts of the citizen-led effort to halt the highway and expansion of public transit along a new greenway in Boston.
Dr. Karilyn Crockett is the City of Boston’s first Chief of Equity, a Cabinet-level position Mayor Walsh established to embed equity and racial justice into all City planning, operations, and work. Dr. Crockett most recently worked as a Lecturer of Public Policy & Urban Planning at MIT, and is the author of People before Highways: Boston Activists, Urban Planners, and a New Movement for City Making. Prior, she worked in the City of Boston’s Office of Economic Development, where she was tasked with creating an equity-driven policy framework for guiding job creation, small business development, neighborhood revitalization and public procurement strategies. Dr. Crockett is also the co-founder of Multicultural Youth Tour of What’s Now (MYTOWN), an award-winning, Boston-based, education nonprofit organization, and holds a PhD from the American Studies program at Yale University, a Master of Science in Geography from the London School of Economics, and a Master of Arts and Religion from Yale Divinity School.

 

Details
When: Wednesday, January 20, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Featuring

  • Larry Kearns, FAIA, LEED AP, Principal, Wheeler Kearns Architects
  • Brenda Palms Barber, Founder/President & CEO, North Landale Employment Network and CEO, Sweet Beginnings, LLC
  • Chris Bosso, Professor of Public Policy and Associate Director of the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University

Like many cities, Chicago’s existing food supply chain is long and fragile, with a massive carbon footprint. In 2019, Wheeler Kearns Architects (WKA) floated a proposal to establish Chicago’s first Food Innovation District on the West Side, building on neighborhood assets like Inspiration Kitchens—Garfield Park (2013 RBA Gold Medalist). Other investments include the Hatchery, a food business incubator, and Sweet Beginnings, a social enterprise sustained by honey harvested at six apiaries located throughout the City. Join WKA Principal Larry Kearns and North Landale Employment Network/Sweet Beginnings’ CEO Brenda Palms Barber for a discussion about how growing, preparing, and processing food creates jobs, improves public health, and revitalizes neighborhoods, ensuring that every dollar Chicagoans spend on food benefits local communities while decreasing the City’s carbon footprint.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand and describe how investment in urban food systems can address community welfare and affect economic, environmental, and social change.
  • Discuss the value of engaging in collaborative partnerships in the planning, design, and development of inclusive, community-based projects.
  • Identify and describe examples of food-focused initiatives that increase access to healthy food, create jobs, and revitalize neighborhoods.
  • Describe the components of a Food Innovation District using case studies and reference materials.

Details
When: Wednesday, January 27, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Featuring:

A high school was an essential component of the vision for Crosstown Concourse (2019 RBA Gold Medalist), the transformation of an abandoned, 1.5 million square foot Sears, Roebuck & Co. distribution center in Memphis into an inclusive, vertical mixed-used village anchored by arts, education, and healthcare. Crosstown High is a ‘learner-centered’ public charter school (and member of the national XQ Super School network) that engages grades 9 through 12 students in interdisciplinary project-based learning that emphasizes problem solving, collaboration, relationship, and communication skills. Join Todd Richardson, President of Crosstown Redevelopment Cooperative, and Ginger Spickler, Chief of Staff of Crosstown High, for a discussion about how the 16-acre complex—designed to promote openness, connection, and exchange—is a classroom for real-world collaboration, exchange, learning and community-building.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand and describe how investment in urban development can address community welfare through access to arts and culture, education, healthcare, and affect economic, environmental, and social change.
  • Discuss the value of engaging in collaborative partnerships in the planning, design, and development of inclusive, community-based projects.
  • Discuss the relationships between the design of schools, educational curricula, and place-based learning.
  • Describe initiatives that are rethinking approaches and redesigning high school education in America.

Details
When: Wednesday, February 3, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Featuring:

  • Ann Yoachim, Director and Professor of Practice, The Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design at Tulane University
  • Julian Wellisz, Transitional Spaces

After a popular makeshift skatepark in New Orleans was demolished, Transitional Spaces, a volunteer-based group of young skaters, approached Tulane University’s Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design for help with developing a new one on city-owned land beneath a highway overpass. Join Small Center Director Ann Yoachim and Transitional Spaces’ Jullian Wellisz for a conversation about how the university-based community design center engaged neighborhood residents, skaters, School of Architecture students, engineering and design professionals, and public agencies in a collaborative design/build process that created Parisite Skatepark (2019 RBA Silver Medalist), the city’s first public skatepark. They’ll discuss how community-engaged design approaches empower and build capacity of people and communities, influence the next generation of designers and practice, and shape the future of cities.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand and describe how investment in recreational amenities can address community welfare and affect economic, environmental, and social change.
  • Discuss the value of engaging in collaborative partnerships in the planning, design, and development of inclusive, community-driven projects.
  • Describe community-engaged design approaches and practices and how they empower and build the capacity of people and communities.
  • Discuss how university-based design centers are resources for cities, educate the next generation of designers, and influence the future of practice.

Details
When: Wednesday, February 10, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, February 17, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, February 24, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, March 3, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, March 1o, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, Macrh 17, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, March 24, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, March 31, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, April 7, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, April 14, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center

Details
When: Wednesday, April 21, 2021
Time: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. EST
Where: Online

Facilitator: Ted Landsmark, Director, Dukakis Center


Register

Please note: If you are signing up for Myra Kraft Open Classroom updates, other event-related announcements, and/or information about our programs, you will also receive our monthly newsletter. We will not distribute your contact information to any third party at any time.

*Important Notes*

With MKOC fully online, we’ll have to make a few slight adjustments to a new format. Please be aware of the following:

  • One hour prior to each week’s session, we will send a reminder email with a Zoom Webinar link for your convenience.
  • These events will be recorded. As an attendee, your face and name will not be visible.
  • We have a 500-person limit, so if you are unable to join via Zoom, please utilize our livestream on Facebook Live (You do not need to be a member of Facebook to view the livestream. If you don’t see the video at first, you may have to scroll down slightly).
  • You will still be able to ask questions, even anonymously, via the Q&A option on the bottom of your screen. 

You can find more resources for joining a Zoom Webinar as an attendee here.