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Homemade weapon used to assassinate former Japanese prime minister. What does this mean for the country?

Japan's national election for the House of Councillors, July 10, 2012. Shinzo Abe, former Prime Minister of Japan, delivers a speech at Yokohama Station, Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture. on July 6 2022 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Kazuki Oishi/Sipa USA)(Sipa via AP Images)

Former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was assassinated at a rally on Friday, sending shockwaves through Japan and around the globe. Abe, who was Japan’s longest-serving prime minister when he resigned in 2020, was shot by a lone gunman and died hours later. The alleged shooter used a homemade firearm, and was tackled and arrested, NPR reports.

“It’s shocking, and it’s tragic, and it’s complicated,” says Daniel Aldrich, professor of political science and public policy at Northeastern. In the wake of Abe’s violent death, two Northeastern professors reflect on how an assassination could happen in a largely gun-free nation, and on Abe’s complicated legacy. “It’s shocking because it’s just so unlikely,” Aldrich says.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

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