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What’s in ‘the biggest piece of climate legislation’ in U.S. history?

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Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., speaks to reporters about the agreement he reached with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., following months of negotiations on health care, energy, climate issues, and tax initiatives, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, Aug. 1, 2021. Manchin returned to the Senate after a week away to recover from COVID-19. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Potentially transformational climate change legislation was given new life last week after Senate Democrats came to an agreement with Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV).

The agreement aims to tackle climate change, taxes, health care and inflation as part of the Inflation Reduction Act, with $369.75 billion set aside for energy security and climate change programs over the next 10 years. Senate Democrats claim the legislation would reduce carbon emissions by 40% by 2030, allowing the U.S. to hit the Biden administration’s climate goals.

Although the legislation is preliminary and the result of political maneuvering, Laura Kuhl, assistant professor of public policy and urban affairs at Northeastern, says it is “absolutely the biggest piece of climate legislation that’s ever been considered in U.S. policy.”

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

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