Skip to content
Apply
Stories

Recovery from Hurricane Fiona cuts to the heart of US-Puerto Rico relations

(AP Photo/Alejandro Granadillo)
Homes are flooded on Salinas Beach after the passing of Hurricane Fiona in Salinas, Puerto Rico, Monday, Sept. 19, 2022.

Eugene Smotkin’s sabbatical was interrupted over the weekend when he lost power at his house in San Juan, Puerto Rico. And Hurricane Fiona, which brought 80 mph winds, dropped 30 inches of rain on the island and caused widespread, intense flooding, hadn’t even arrived yet.

“Here, the blackout began even before the storm hit us,” says Smotkin, a Northeastern University professor of chemistry and chemical biology.

Smotkin was not alone. The entire power grid went down in Puerto Rico, leaving the island’s 3 million residents without electricity. It wreaked havoc on antiquated infrastructure that has still not been updated since 2017’s Hurricane Maria, the most destructive storm in the island’s history. Hurricane Maria left 3,000 people dead–most of them after the initial storm as a nearly year-long power outage prolonged the impacts.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

More Stories

If Russia is developing some kind of space-based weapon, Putin may never get to use it. Here’s why.

02.20.2024

Minority victims die more often, and at younger ages, from violence. New research explains why “people of color are doubly victimized”

02.20.2024

Capital One and Discover merger may be a response to an adjacent concern: the Visa and Mastercard duopoly, economist says

02.21.24
Northeastern Global News