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Ruth Bader Ginsburg leaves behind an unmatched legacy. How might her death shape the 2020 election and beyond?

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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, speaks during the keynote address or the State Bar of New Mexico's Annual Meeting in Pojoaque, N.M.,Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Craig Fritz)

If there were a Mt. Rushmore dedicated to influential scholars and leaders of American law, Ruth Bader Ginsburg would be one of a handful whose likeness would befit its grand stone face, says Dan Urman, who teaches a course at Northeastern on Constitutional law and the modern U.S. Supreme Court. 

This would remain true, he says, even if she never served on the nation’s highest court.

The 87-year-old, who died at her home in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 18 from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer, will be memorialized as an iconic figure who faced and overcame discrimination in her personal life to make history as the second woman to ever serve on the Supreme Court.

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