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One way to root out racial injustice on the ground and on social media? Consequences, say Northeastern experts.

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From top left: Rod Brunson, Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. Chair of Public Life; Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice and Political Science; Director of Graduate Mentoring and Diversity Initiatives, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Costas Panagopoulos, Professor and Department Chair of Political Science, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Brooke Foucault Wells, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, College of Arts, Media, and Design and Pat Williams, University Distinguished Professor of Law and Humanities, School of Law and College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Screenshots by Northeastern University

The GOP schism, and the influence Trump continues to wield, echoes a theme of deep division across the country.

“Our gravely fractured nation is at a crossroads once again and does not have the luxury of waiting,” says Rod K. Brunson, a Northeastern criminology professor and Thomas P. O’Neill Jr. Chair of Public Life.

Brunson added, however, that President Joe Biden’s vow to root out racial injustice “offers a critical opportunity for change.”

Brunson was one of four Northeastern faculty members who discussed the Capitol siege and the ideological forces behind the insurrection at an event titled, “White Supremacy, Insurrection, and U.S. Democracy.” The Tuesday evening event was part of “Conflict. Civility. Respect. Peace. Northeastern Reflects,” the university’s educational series on civic sustainability.

Read the full story on News@Northeastern.

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