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Derek Chauvin’s guilty verdict is a step toward justice and police reform–but it’s not the end of racism in the U.S.

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Philonise Floyd, Attorney Ben Crump and the Rev, Al Sharpton, from left, react after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Minneapolis, Minn. Former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin has been convicted of murder and manslaughter in the death of Floyd. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck until he died, was found guilty of all three counts related to Floyd’s murder on Tuesday.

Floyd’s death nearly a year ago touched off protests around the world against police violence and racial injustice. Floyd, a Black man, was unarmed when Chauvin, a white man, killed him. The event was filmed by a bystander, and the video ricocheted across social media platforms, stirring outrage over the clear falsehood in the way police reported the incident at the time.

Law & criminology professor Daniel Medwed gave a breakdown of Chauvin’s three charges, and criminology professor Jack McDevitt said he was optimistic that the verdict might portend a broader change in policing. While the verdict is a step in the right direction, it’s not the end of injustice in the United States.

Read the full story on Northeastern News.

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