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If there’s a will, there’s a way to stop more shootings

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A law like Massachusetts has would probably have kept the Highland Park shooting suspect from getting his weapons.

It’s a regular story after mass shootings: The young, male mass shooter who managed to get a gun despite any number of warning signs of violent ideation and proclivities. We see that now with Robert Crimo III, the suspected shooter who killed seven people and wounded two dozen more during a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Ill.

He had reportedly attempted suicide in April of 2019 and then, in September, had threatened to kill everyone in his household. One household member told officers he “was afraid to go home due to the nature of this threat.”

So why, as has been asked again and again, was he allowed to buy firearms, including two military-style assault rifles?

Read the full article in the Boston Globe.

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