Rachel Sederberg ’19
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My Story

Rachel graduated from Stonehill College in 2013 with a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and a minor in Mathematics. She also engaged in two summers of economic research experience.

Her interest in labor economics drew her to the PhD program in Applied Economics at Northeastern University, where members of the department were conducting research similar to what she aspires to do in her career.

Here is Rachel’s Northeastern story…

My Path
Northeastern University
Why Applied Economics?

“I chose the PhD program in Applied Economics at Northeastern for a number of reasons. The first reason being that Northeastern is located in Boston, where there are almost infinite professional resources for graduate students and economists. The second major deciding factor for me was the labor economics concentration of the program. During my undergraduate education, I took a course in labor economics, and I found it to be one of the most interesting courses. Because of this experience, I sought out a program with a strength in labor economics.”

 

Transformative Coursework

Rachel’s most transformative courses were the field courses she took at the end of her coursework.

“The Labor Field Courses exposed me to great deal of important work in the field of Labor Economics, opening my eyes to the width and breadth of possibilities for research. Labor encompasses a great deal of topics, more than I had even anticipated when choosing the field. There is so much exciting work, and so many directions to look in. I was also able to learn about many econometric techniques that I had not seen in my previous economic courses. These methods are ones that I now plan to use in my own research.”

Northeastern University/ Eric Winter
Research

Another transformative experience for Rachel is the research that she continues to do with faculty members in the economics department.

“Being a part of a large research project allows me to get meaningful experience that will help me be a confident and experienced researcher once it is my turn to lead a project.”

The most transformative experience is ongoing – her own dissertation.

“I am now able to put all my experience and education to use, and to work on something that is my very own brain-child in a supportive environment.”

Professional Development

During her years at Northeastern, Rachel has gone to professional conferences and presented her own research. Most recently, she went to Washington D.C. to the 2016 Southern Economic Association Meeting and presented a paper on optimizing the use of unemployment insurance during periods of high unemployment.  This paper will become a chapter in her dissertation.

Rachel has spent her summers working for professors in the Department of Economics as a research assistant. This work exposed her to even more research topics and opportunities, and allowed her to remain on track with her own research, as well.

One recent project, “Consequences of Long-term Unemployment for Household Finances,” that Rachel worked on with NU Economics Chair William Dickens and Robert Triest (Federal Reserve) has been published in the April 2017 issue of The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences.

Northeastern University/ Adam Glanzman
Next Steps

The remainder of Rachel’s time at Northeastern will be spent on her dissertation. She will be defending her dissertation proposal in the Spring of 2019 and will then pursue her professional goals.

Northeastern University/ Matthew Modoono
This was Rachel's Northeastern Pathway... Where will yours lead?

Learn more at:

Department of Economics