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The death toll in the Kentucky floods is climbing. Could this have been prevented?

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(AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
Bonnie Combs, right, hugs her 10-year-old granddaughter Adelynn Bowling watches as her property becomes covered by the North Fork of the Kentucky River in Jackson, Ky., Thursday, July 28, 2022. Flash flooding and mudslides were reported across the mountainous region of eastern Kentucky, where thunderstorms have dumped several inches of rain over the past few days.

Recovery efforts are underway as Kentucky enters its second week of an extreme flooding event. The death toll from the flooding is 37 and expected to rise. Those who have died in the flooding included four young children, and many residents are still missing, CNN reports. Downed bridges, extreme heat and power outages hamper rescue efforts; meanwhile, many residents have been displaced and even more face damage to their properties.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear called the flooding “the most devastating flood event our state has ever seen” during a press conference on Wednesday. After touring affected areas, he described destroyed homes, vehicles and businesses, and warned of the continued threats of storms and rising heat. “It’s hard to explain the level of damage,” he said.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

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