Skip to content
Connect
Stories

Virtual schooling has largely forced moms, not dads, to quit work. It will hurt the economy for years.

People in this story

Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP
An Orange County Public Schools sixth-grade student participates in a virtual learning class from home, Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020, in Orlando, Fla. Early primary voting is underway in Florida.

Washington Post, November 2020

In late October, Courtney Allen got the call she had been waiting for: A school district asked if she could come back as a substitute teacher. Allen desperately needed the money as she was getting only $125 a week in unemployment benefits. But she had to turn down the job.

Her kindergartner and first-grade sons are still at home all day, learning virtually. Allen is part of a wave of women having tomake difficult decisions that will affect family finances, as well as the broader U.S. economy, for years to come.

The pandemic recession has been dubbed a “she-session” because it has hurt women far worse than men. The share of women working or looking for work has fallen to the lowest level since 1988, wiping out decades of hard-fought gains in the workplace.

On Friday, the Labor Department’s jobs report showed that the economy has gained back just over half of the jobs lost in March and April, but the situation remains dire for women. There are 2.2 million fewer women working or looking for work now than in January, vs. 1.5 million fewer men, according to the Labor Department data.

Continue reading at the Washington Post.

More Stories

Right-wing Christians have increasingly been using shofars and other Jewish symbols at rallies, an act that some Jews call offensive.

Why right-wing Christian politicians are blowing the shofar

09.26.2022
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Democrat from New York, rallies hundreds of young climate activists in Lafayette Square to demand that President Joe Biden work to make the Green New Deal into law on June 28, 2021.

Millennials and Gen Z want to stop a climate catastrophe. But first they have to get elected.

09.22.2022
Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker speaks Sept. 21 at the Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Center. He was joined by his former chief of staff Steve Kadish to talk about their co-written book, “Results.”

‘Getting beyond politics’: Gov. Baker visits Northeastern with former chief of staff to talk achieving ‘Results’

09.28.22
In the News