Visiting Scholars Program

The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program at Northeastern annually offers research associate positions to scholars researching issues related to women, gender, and/or sexuality in the humanities and social sciences. Visiting scholars work on their related projects while in residence for the semester or academic year at Northeastern University. Scholars must have their own financial support, but are provided with office space, library privileges, and support for photocopy, fax, and postage expenses related to research. Located in the heart of Boston, Northeastern University is ideally located for scholars. Beyond its proximity to Boston’s vibrant cultural and artistic life, Northeastern is near several major research libraries, including the Boston Public Library and the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College, as well as numerous academic institutions that make the intellectual life of Boston one of the richest in the world..

For a list of previous Visiting Scholars, please click here.

2019-2020 Visiting Scholars

We are pleased to welcome the following visiting scholars for the 2018-2019 academic year. Scholars will be in residence at Northeastern from September 2019 – May 2020, unless otherwise noted.

 

Jamie J. Hagen

Jamie is currently the James N. Rosenau Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Studies Association and an affiliated scholar at the Pembroke Center of Brown University. She recently received her PhD in Global Governance and Human Security from UMass Boston. While in residence at Northeastern, Dr. Hagen proposes to prepare a book proposal from her dissertation, “Queering Women, Peace, and Security” which bridges feminist security studies with queer theory to offer a more complete gender analysis of how the implementation of the eight Women, Peace and Security (WPS) UN Security Council Resolutions impacts women living in conflict-related environments and uses discourse analysis to investigate how WPS actors define “women” and “gender” in practice. Dr. Hagen’s research argues for peace building practices that address the oversight of marginalized sexual orientations and gender identities. Concretely, in her first semester, Hagen proposes to submit two scholarly articles related to her book for publication. The first examines the use of the category of gender in the WPS architecture and the second looks at heteronormative responses to gender-based violence and the heteronormativity that persists in the WPS architecture. Her research interests include international relations and gender, sexuality, and critical security studies. She was the digital media editor for the International Journal of Politics.

Emily Hainze

Emily is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Boston University Kilachand Honors College. She recently received a PhD in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. Dr. Hainze’s research interests include: digital and public methodologies and literary archives of the carceral state. While at Northeastern, Hainze’s project would be writing and revising her book manuscript, Incorrigible: Writing from the Early Women’s Prison in the United States. This book illuminates the literary and cultural history of the women’s prison as it was established as a separate institution in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It draws together an unexpected array of texts – from celebrated rebels to unknown “incorrigibles”, or women who refused to follow sexual norms— that document women’s imprisonment in order to reimagine social difference and social intimacy in a modernizing United States. The project also examines how women’s incarceration shaped intersecting formations of race, gender, and sexuality in the US even as incarcerated women refused those hierarchies.

Ivana Isailovic

Ivana is currently a Visiting Scholar at the Northeastern’s own School of Law and the Center for the Study of Europe at Boston University and has taught for the WGSS in the past as part time lecturer. She holds a PhD in Law from Sciences Po Paris Law School. Isailovic proposes to work on Family Law as a Site of Global Governance, which will examine how family law doctrines, discourses, and practices are deployed to distribute resources and privileges globally based on gender, race, and citizenship and how family law perpetuates and is shaped by nation state building projects and neoliberal policies. A second project will analyze connections between neoliberalism and feminist legal theory. Isailovic’s research interests include: the intersection of law and gender studies, and how law shapes gender and sexuality norms in a global context.

Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellow & Visiting Scholar in WGSS & DH

With support from the College of Social Sciences and Humanities, WGSS announced the creation of the Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellow and Visiting Scholar in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Digital Humanities.– a first of its kind postdoctoral fellowship. The Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellow and Visiting Scholar was a two-year appointment, from 2014-2016, who taught courses in both WGSS and the Digital Humanities and who worked closely with the WGSS program and the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. Moya Bailey joined Northeastern as the Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellow and Visiting Scholar in WGSS and DH beginning in July of 2014; she is now full-time faculty in both WGSS and the department of Cultures, Societies, and Global Studies.

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