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What Ebola and HIV/​AIDS can teach us about the Zika virus pandemic

Zika Virus Image for News Article

Richard Wamai, assis­tant pro­fessor in the Depart­ment of African Amer­ican Studies and an expert in inter­na­tional global health and devel­op­ment, talks about the Zika virus’s his­tory, puz­zling tra­jec­tory, and public health inter­ven­tions that could stem its spread.

The Zika virus con­tinues to spread, with WHO pre­dicting that as many as 4 mil­lion people could be infected by the end of the year. As of Feb. 10, there were 52 cases in the U.S. asso­ci­ated with travel abroad, according to the Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion. Sus­pected to be asso­ci­ated with the birth defect micro­cephaly and the par­a­lyzing Guillain-​​Barré Syn­drome, Zika remains a con­stant in the news as gov­ern­ments scramble to warn their cit­i­zens about the risks.

In this in-​​depth Q&A, Richard Wamai, assis­tant pro­fessor in the Depart­ment of African Amer­ican Studies and an expert in inter­na­tional global health and devel­op­ment, talks about the Zika virus’s his­tory, puz­zling tra­jec­tory, and public health inter­ven­tions that could stem its spread.

Read the full story at news@Northeastern.

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