Skip to content
Topics
Stories

Crunch time at Pepsi for a friend of the workers

People in this story

Financial Times, August 2021

Darren Walker should be a perfect ally for hundreds of workers who quit their jobs earlier this summer at the Frito-Lay plant in Kansas and complained about workload pressures and inadequate wages. Walker is a longtime president of the Ford Foundation, one of the most famous philanthropic activities in the world.The future of work“. Earlier this year, Walker co-authored the following essay:[W]Looking back at the pandemic, history will ask how business leaders rethinked their approach to employees and protected them. ”

However, Walker was in a difficult position with respect to the impressive factory workers. He is also an officer of Frito-Lay’s parent PepsiCo. When he joined Pepsi Walker admitted He put his trust and the Ford Foundation’s trust on the line. Subsequent controversies have highlighted a natural clash between large corporations that want to involve diverse leaders and these new people who believe they can lead them to more responsible capitalism.

Black walkers understand the financial difficulties. He was born in the Deep South just as the formal Jim Crow barrier was being demolished. After spending his time on Wall Street as a legal counsel, Walker joined Harlem’s community development group, Abyssinian Development Corporation, before moving to The Rockefeller Foundation and then to Ford.

Immediately after taking command at Ford in 2015, he wrote: Influential essayTowards the new gospel of wealth.. Walker concludes that capitalism can be reformed by “bridging” the philosophies of Adam Smith, Andrew Carnegie, and Martin Luther King and “turning the demand curve toward justice.”

Continue reading at the Financial Times.

More Stories

Vermont’s worker shortage is among the greatest in the country, study says

09.15.2021

How Boston is embracing smart tech to make its roads safer, close the digital divide, and combat climate change

09.15.2021

The benefits of Japan’s social infrastructure and civic ties in uncertain times

09.16.21
Op-eds