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Despite partisan divide, workplace vaccine mandates have strong support, study finds

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Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University
Nurse practitioner Shashi Narayan Uhlmann prepares to administer the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to CTC staff member, Mukul Agrawal who studies construction management at Northeastern’s Cabot Testing Center on Jan. 06, 2021.

A solid 60 percent of U.S. residents support government-mandated COVID-19 workplace vaccinations, but there was a wide gap between Democrats and Republicans, according to a poll taken after President Biden ordered businesses with at least 100 employees to require vaccination or undergo weekly testing.

The U.S. study by the Covid States Project, a collaborative effort by researchers from Northeastern, Harvard, Northwestern, and Rutgers, found support for workplace immunizations among men and women as well as people of different races, ethnicities, and age groups. But the study found a partisan chasm of 46 percentage points between Democrats and Republicans, with Democrats overwhelmingly in favor of backing vaccination requirements for businesses—81 percent to 35 percent for Republicans. Independents came in in the middle at 53 percent.

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