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Diane Noomin, 75, Who Helped Bring Feminism to Underground Comics, Dies

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The underground cartoonist Diane Noomin in 1980 as her best-known character, DiDi Glitz. With Ms. Noomin in costume, the character made her first appearance at a Halloween party in the early 1970s.Credit...

New York Times, September 2022

Diane Noomin, who was a pioneer of feminist underground comics in the 1970s and whose comic book Twisted Sisters, a collaboration with her fellow artist Aline Kominsky-Crumb, has been a touchstone for generations of female cartoonists, died on Sept. 1 at her home in Hadlyme, Conn. She was 75.

The cause was uterine cancer, said her husband, Bill Griffith, the cartoonist whose best-known creation is Zippy the Pinhead.

Ms. Noomin’s best-known creation was DiDi Glitz — a curvy, big-haired, leopard-print-loving, fishnet-stocking-and-miniskirt-wearing and hard-drinking single mother. DiDi, whose world was filled with bad sex, sleazy men, cocktails and extravagant decorating, was a sendup of a certain kind of suburban stock character, but she was rendered with both affection and compassion.

Continue reading at the New York Times.

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