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Part-Time Lecturer in English; Director of the General Studies Program

Lynn Dornink specializes in teaching first year writing courses. She enjoys working with students who tell her that they, “don’t like writing,” and takes it as a personal challenge to convince them otherwise. She uses a variety of media in her classes, but especially likes teaching graphic novels, film, and poetry.

In her spare time she can be found attempting to bathe her mangy dog, Lana Turner, and reading Entertainment Weekly. She is also the Director of the General Studies Program. 

  • “Silencing the Feminine.” The Contemporary Reader, 6th edition, Longman, 1999.
  • “To a Daughter Lost.” First-Year Writing Anthology, 2nd edition,  Utah State Press, 1985.
  • Education

    MA English Literature (Creative Writing), Syracuse University

  • Contact

  • Address

    52 Meserve Hall
    360 Huntington Avenue
    Boston, MA 02115

  • Office Hours

    Wednesday 11-1

Courses

Course catalog
  • Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres—such as literature reviews, case studies, protocols, and care instructions—relevant for careers in nursing, pharmacy, and other health professions. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

  • First-Year Writing

    ENGW 1111

    Designed for students to study and practice writing in a workshop setting. Students read a range of texts in order to describe and evaluate the choices writers make and apply that knowledge to their own writing and explore how writing functions in a range of academic, professional, and public contexts. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to conduct research using primary and secondary sources; how to write for various purposes and audiences in multiple genres and media; and how to give and receive feedback, to revise their work, and to reflect on their growth as writers.

  • Designed for students whose first or strongest language is not English. Students study and practice writing in a workshop setting; read a range of texts in order to describe and evaluate the choices writers make and apply that knowledge to their own writing; explore how writing functions in a variety of academic, professional, and public contexts; and write for various purposes and audiences in multiple genres and media. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to conduct research using primary and secondary sources and to give and receive feedback, to revise their work, and to reflect on their growth as writers.

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