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Associate Teaching Professor in English

Sarah Finn began teaching and mentoring first-year students as early as her undergraduate years at Tufts University. Her research focuses on affect, social justice pedagogies, and the interconnections of student activism and classroom writing processes. Her work has been published in the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights: Multi-Diversity Myers Book Commentary, and she has also written and researched for an array of legal, governmental, and nonprofit groups. Sarah received the Walker Gibson Prize for best essay in composition and rhetoric from the UMass Amherst Department of English. She also received the Residential First-Year Experience Student Choice Award from UMass Amherst students for her teaching of first year writing.

  • Phi Beta Kappa | Tufts University
  • Golden Key National Honors Society | Tufts University
  • Residential First-Year Experience Student Choice Award | 2012 | University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Walker Gibson Prize for Composition Best Essay | 2010 | English Department | University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Heroic Husky Community Service Award | 826 Boston | 2014 | Northeastern University
  • Education

    PhD in Composition and Rhetoric Studies, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
    MA in English, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
    BA in Philosophy, Tufts University

  • Contact

  • Address

    431 Lake Hall
    360 Huntington Avenue
    Boston, MA 02115

  • Office Hours

    Tuesday from 1-3pm and by appointment

Courses

Course catalog
  • First-Year Writing

    ENGW 1111

    Designed for students to study and practice writing in a workshop setting. Students read a range of texts in order to describe and evaluate the choices writers make and apply that knowledge to their own writing and explore how writing functions in a range of academic, professional, and public contexts. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to conduct research using primary and secondary sources; how to write for various purposes and audiences in multiple genres and media; and how to give and receive feedback, to revise their work, and to reflect on their growth as writers.

  • Designed for students whose first or strongest language is not English. Students study and practice writing in a workshop setting; read a range of texts in order to describe and evaluate the choices writers make and apply that knowledge to their own writing; explore how writing functions in a variety of academic, professional, and public contexts; and write for various purposes and audiences in multiple genres and media. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to conduct research using primary and secondary sources and to give and receive feedback, to revise their work, and to reflect on their growth as writers.

  • Offers writing instruction for students interested in interdisciplinary study or who wish to explore multiple disciplines. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres relevant to their individual experiences and goals. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and to develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

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