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Refugee Crisis: The Borders of Human Mobility | Serena Parekh

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Serena Parekh, Associate Professor of Philosophy; Director of Politics, Philosophy and Economics Program

Melina Duarte, Post-Doctoral Researcher in Philosophy, The Arctic University of Norway

Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Professor of Political Science, Aarhus University

Annamari Vitikainen, Associate Professor of Philosophy, The Arctic University of Norway

How should we respond to the worst refugee crisis since the World War II? What are our duties towards refugees, and how should we distribute these duties among those at the receiving end of the refugee flow? What are the relevant political solutions? Are some states more responsible for creating the current refugee situation, and if so, should they also carry a larger burden on solving this situation? Is people smuggling always morally wrong? Are some groups, for example children, owed more than others, and should we thus take active measures to remove them from conflict zones? How are the existing refugee regimes, in Europe, North-America, or Australia, challenged by the current crisis? Are some of their measures more justified than others?

Refugee Crisis: The Borders of Human Mobility discusses the various ethical dilemmas and potential political solutions to the ongoing refugee crisis, providing both theoretical and practical reflections on the current crisis, as well as the ways in which this crisis has been handled in public debate. The contributors to the volume include some of the most prominent political theorists and experts on the current refugee situation, as well as some of the upcoming young scholars working on the theme. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Global Ethics.

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