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Technicalities keep people in prison, says Northeastern professor in new book

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Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

The United States legal system can seem maze-like, so complex that people convicted of major crimes can slip through its fingers.

“But the reality that I learned over many years in the trenches,” says Daniel Medwed, Northeastern University distinguished professor of law and criminal justice, is that “technicalities are what keep people in prison.”

Medwed, who served as an associate appellate counsel in the criminal appeals bureau of the Legal Aid Society in New York City and is a founding member of the Innocence Network, says that these technicalities are used to entrap people even when they can reasonably be proven not guilty, whether through new evidence, revelations of judicial malfeasance, or further scholarly investigation.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

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