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Which issues will matter most to voters in the midterm elections and what does that say about their morals?

(Anthony Behar/Sipa USA)(Sipa via AP Images)
A woman stands at a voting privacy booth as her dogs stands by inside Madison Square Garden (MSG) on the first day of early voting for the 2020 Presidential elections in New York City, NY, October 24, 2020. In a deal reached with the NBA, sports arenas such as MSG will be used as polling sites, one of 88 early voting ballot casting sites, this the first time in history New York participates in early voting.

Midterm elections—those which occur near the midpoint of a president’s four-year term in the United States—are typically viewed by policymakers as a referendum on the president’s party. If citizens approve of the job the president is doing, his party typically fares well. If not, it doesn’t. 

But this year, with a veritable bingo-card of polarizing issues on the table, might the midterms be viewed as a litmus test for voters’ morals, instead? As the U.S. marches steadily toward Nov. 8, high-profile gun violence makes headlines again and again, a Congressional committee investigates the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol that may well amount to criminal conspiracy, states restrict or outlaw abortion access, and hate crimes skyrocket, all while inflation reaches its highest point in decades. 

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