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Can the destructive bootleg fire teach us to prevent wildfires before they start?

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(AP Photo/Noah Berger)
Firefighters battle the Sugar Fire, part of the Beckwourth Complex Fire, in Doyle, Calif., on Friday, July 9, 2021.

As the Bootleg fire in southern Oregon continues its destructive growth practically unabated, it threatens homes and critical infrastructure—threats that will only grow more dire as climate change dries out large swaths of the country and people increasingly move out of urban centers and into woodland areas, say two Northeastern professors who study climate science and resilience.

The fire, which began on July 6 near Bootleg Spring in Klamath County, Oregon, quickly grew out of control and has consumed more than 220,000 acres in the last week. As of July 15, it was the largest wildfire among dozens burning in the United States, and could be seen from space.

More than 1,700 firefighters are battling the conflagration that’s destroyed 76 buildings—including 21 homes—and threatens another 1,900. But the record-setting heat and extremely dry conditions that have plagued the western coast of the continent have made the task Herculean. Firefighters in the region have said that much of the water dropped by aircraft to quell the flames evaporates before it even reaches the ground.

“What we’re seeing here is the perfect storm of climate change-induced drought in the West, along with more people living in the wildland-urban interface,” says Stephen E. Flynn, founding director of Northeastern’s Global Resilience Institute as well as a professor of political science at the university. “It’s requiring us to rethink how we live, work, and build in a place that is at a growing risk for wildfires and extreme weather.”

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

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