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Could the supreme court nomination of Amy Coney Barrett backfire on republicans?

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AP Photo/Alex Brandon

President Donald Trump’s nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court has deepened the U.S. partisan divide in a way that may influence the election in November, says Dan Urman, who teaches a course at Northeastern on Constitutional law and the modern U.S. Supreme Court. 

“The pick shows that Trump is governing as the president of the red states,” says Urman, in reference to Barrett’s high standing with conservatives. If she is confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Barrett is expected to support the weakening or abolishment of legalized abortion, the Affordable Care Act, and other causes that are valued by progressives.

Conservative justices would hold a 6-3 majority if Barrett goes on to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a leader of progressive causes who died Sept. 18 at age 87 due to complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas. Trump, who has already indicated that he may challenge the results of his race with Democratic candidate Joe Biden, has said that he would like Barrett to be seated on the court before the Nov. 3 presidential election.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

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