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Does Taylor Swift deserve criticism over her private jet habits?

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(Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
Taylor Swift attends a premiere for the short film

Criticism of Taylor Swift on social media soared this past weekend after the pop singer topped a list of celebrities most guilty of polluting the planet with their private jets. 

Swift’s jet was in use for 170 out of the first 200 days of the year and emitted 8,293.54 metric tonnes of CO2e, 1,184.8 times what a normal person emits each year, according to a report from the sustainable marketing firm Yard. Out of the 21 celebrities ranked in the report, in 2022 the average celebrity jet emitted 3376.64 tonnes of CO2e this year, or 482.37 times the average person’s emissions per year. Social media users were quick to respond to the findings over the weekend, creating memes depicting Swift using her private jet to go to Starbucks or to get a glass of water. Swift released a statement saying she regularly loans out her private jet to others. 

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

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