Skip to content
Connect
Stories

For political parties, virtual conventions have their pros and cons

People in this story

Marketplace/NPR, August 2020

The Republican National Convention starts Monday. And if you watched any of the Democratic convention, you know this year’s mix of live and pre-recorded speeches was a departure from the traditional format. National conventions are a form of marketing, and the COVID-19 economy has forced both parties to go virtual.

Without a live audience, political parties miss out on a way to broadcast enthusiasm for a message.

“You don’t get the applause at certain points. You don’t get the orchestrated signs that people were holding up,” said Costas Panagopoulos, professor of political science at Northeastern University and editor of “Rewiring Politics,” a book about modern party conventions.

Continue reading at Marketplace.

More Stories

An electrical worker installed wiring for heat pumps in a 100-year-old brownstone in Brooklyn, N.Y., on March 22.

Boston, state must act on home heating changes

11.30.2022

Biden and Democrats use ‘assault weapons ban’ to position for 2024

11.29.2022
Howard High School Teachers, 1904

Black Teachers and Liberation: A CBFS Interview

11.30.22
In the News