Skip to content
Join fellow black alumni in Oaks Bluff for a fun-filled weekend of bonding and socializing your Northeastern classmates.
Connect
Stories

How the first-ever U.S. energy justice leader develops ideas

People in this story

MIT Sloane School of Management, May 2021

Energy justice is garnering amplification under the Biden administration as policymakers confront vast demographic discrepancies in access to clean energy, ability to pay heating bills, proximity to polluted air, vulnerability to natural disasters, and more. Shalanda Baker is the new (and first-ever) deputy director of energy justice at the U.S. Department of Energy, where she works at the crossroads of environmental policy and racial justice to diminish those gaps.

Baker is also the author of “Revolutionary Power: An Activist’s Guide to the Energy Transition,” a former professor of law and public policy at Northeastern University, and co-founder of the Initiative for Energy Justice.

We talked with Baker about the importance of finding space and silence, either on a walk or when working, and the big idea of transforming how a U.S. cabinet department operates.

Continue reading at MIT Sloane School of Management.

More Stories

Northeastern law professor who is championing energy justice in Washington gets a promotion

06.29.2022

Researcher and mediator Jack McDevitt retires after 45 years at Northeastern

06.27.2022
Sarah Ransome, left, and Elizabeth Stein, who both have accused Jeffrey Epstein of sexual abuse, leave the federal courthouse in New York, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, following the sentencing of Epstein's associate, Ghislaine Maxwell. Maxwell was sentenced to 20 years in prison Tuesday for helping the Epstein sexually abuse underage girls.

Northeastern professors study mental and physical health of teen sex trafficking victims

Research Stories