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Refugees often face violence, mental health issues in the cities where they had sought safety, study says

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(Photo by Sadak Mohamed/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
Migrants in the slums of the capital Mogadishu are seen trying to survive in makeshift tents on December 13, 2020 in Mogadishu, Somali.

Refugees who experience violence in the North American cities where they’ve sought asylum suffer from devastating, long-lasting mental health issues—and those issues can impact them just as deeply as the violence they faced in their home country, says Carmel Salhi, assistant professor of health sciences. 

A new study on the mental health impact of violence on refugees provides valuable insight into the ongoing issues facing an already marginalized population, says Salhi. Using data from a community-partnered study funded by National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities with Somali refugees living in North American cities of like Boston and Minneapolis. The study is part of a multi-year effort of Northeastern’s Institute for Health Equity and Social Justice Researchand the Refugee Trauma and Children’s Centerat the Boston Children’s Hospital to better understand both mental health risk and resilience among refugee populations.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

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News@Northeastern