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The most cutting-edge technological innovation in the future might just be … humans

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Far from being an isolated field, artificial intelligence is a tool—one that is already improving the safety and efficacy of medicine, the appropriateness of internet search results, and even the quality of the sound from your speakers. Indeed, as thought-leaders of all kinds explained at the kickoff event for Northeastern University’s Institute for Experiential Artificial Intelligence, companies ­must integrate information and innovation built upon insight from artificial intelligence in order to stay relevant in the future.

It’s important not to think about AI as an island unto itself, in which case it would just be a wasted opportunity,” said David Roux, co-founder and co-managing partner of BayPine Capital, who, along with his wife Barbara, are the founding benefactors of the Roux Institute at Northeastern University in Portland, Maine. “All of the most interesting things are happening at the interface of AI and other subject matter.”

Roux joined Joseph E. Aoun, president of Northeastern, for a fireside chat-style conversation that opened up a daylong event to launch the Institute for Experiential Artificial Intelligence. They were joined by a number of chief executives, researchers, founders, directors, and disruptors to explore the future of AI. A series of panels and discussions brought together leaders across a variety of industries in person on Northeastern’s Boston campus as well as a global audience online. The event also included an AI job fair and student research presentations across the Boston campus.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

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