Skip to content
Apply
Stories

The U.S. is developing vaccine passports, but to where exactly?

People in this story

Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

The Biden administration revealed this week that it would work with industries in the private sector to build out a vaccine credential program that would enable people to prove they’ve been inoculated against COVID-19. Businesses that are struggling to reopen are pushing for the program, also called a vaccine passport, but it faces an uncertain future in the courts, say two Northeastern legal scholars who also worry that such a program could exacerbate existing inequities in the vaccine rollout.

But first, it will be important to clarify what, exactly, a vaccine passport would be used for, says Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished Professor of Law at Northeastern.

“This term has been used to mean a lot of different things,” says Parmet, who also leads the Center for Health Policy and Law. “Requiring proof of vaccination to travel is one thing, mandating it for jobs or to attend a university is another, and needing a passport to go into the local Home Depot is yet another.”

Certain countries already require proof of vaccinations against various diseases before travelers can enter. Ghana and Brazil require travelers to be vaccinated against yellow fever. Other countries, such as Afghanistan and Pakistan, require travelers to be inoculated against polio.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

More Stories

In this photo released by Russian Defense Ministry Press Service on Tuesday, May 21, 2024, a Russian Iskander missile is seen during drills to train the military for using tactical nuclear weapons at an undisclosed location in Russia. Russia's Defense Ministry on Tuesday said it began the first stage of drills involving tactical nuclear weapons. It was the first time Russia has publicly announced drills involving tactical nuclear weapons, although its strategic nuclear forces regularly hold exercises. (Russian Defense Ministry Press Service via AP)

“Risks of nuclear terrorism are high and growing.” New tools, alliances, renewed focus needed, group led by Northeastern expert recommends.

06.21.2024
image of combination of Sept. 29, 2020, file photos shows President Donald Trump, left, and former Vice President Joe Biden during the first presidential debate at Case Western University and Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland, Ohio. Amid the tumult of the 2020 presidential campaign, one dynamic has remained constant: The Nov. 3 election offers voters a choice between substantially different policy paths. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

New debate format sets a “low bar” for the first 2024 Trump-Biden clash

06.20.2024
Police officers investigate at the crime scene after multiple people had been shot. On the evening of June 19, a shooting incident is reported by the California Highway Patrol and the Oakland Police Department. Following a supposed Juneteenth celebration, there is a heavy police presence in the Lake Merritt area. The Oakland Police Department investigate the scene and confirm that multiple people had been shot. (Photo by Michael Ho Wai Lee / SOPA Images/Sipa USA)(Sipa via AP Images)

U.S. homicides and violent crime overall are down significantly, according to FBI data

06.21.24
Northeastern Global News