Skip to content
Connect
Stories

What U.S. communities shouldn’t forget in the covid-19 state of emergency

President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference about the coronavirus in the Rose Garden of the White House, Friday, March 13, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The national state of emergency announced by President Donald J. Trump on Friday will give U.S. states and territories access to up to 50 billion dollars in funding to combat the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Trump has also made it easier for public health authorities to waive regulations that might impede providers’ ability to respond to the virus, and slapped a 30-day ban on travel from Europe.

But these efforts aren’t just too late to prevent the rapid spread of the disease first discovered in Wuhan, China, in 2019, says Daniel Aldrich, who directs the security and resilience studies program at Northeastern.

Continue reading at News@Northeastern. 

More Stories

Rally in Lisbon in rejection of Masha Amini's death - 23 Sept 2022

Protests raging across Iran show ‘solidarity’ and anger against regime, Northeastern experts say

09.28.2022
ADVANCE FOR MONDAY AUG. 22 - In this Aug. 5, 2016 photo, Movie reels and old films left over from the Old Texas Theater's years as a movie house sit on display in a cabinet within the Ballinger venue in Ballinger, Texas. Things have been up and down for the Old Texas Theater over the years. Now, the venue is coming back once again.

Northeastern professor uncovers oldest Japanese American film

09.28.2022
Hurricane Ian/Fiona

As Ian batters Florida, Puerto Ricans fear being forgotten

09.29.22
In the News