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Timothy Brown

Professor of History; Chair of History Department

Timothy Scott Brown is the author of Sixties Europe (Cambridge, forthcoming, 2020). His previous books include West Germany and the Global Sixties: The Anti-Authoritarian Revolt, 1962-1978 (Cambridge, 2013) and Weimar Radicals (Berghahn, 2009). He is co-editor (with Andrew Lison) of The Global Sixties in Sound and Vision: Media, Counterculture, Revolt (Palgrave, 2014), and (with Lorena Anton) of Between the Avantgarde and the Everyday: Subversive Politics in Europe, 1957 to the Present (Berghahn, 2011). His essays have appeared in the American Historical Review, the Journal of Social HistoryGerman Studies Review, and Contemporary European History. His new book project is entitled The Greening of Cold War Germany: Environmentalism and Social Movements across the Wall and Beyond, 1968-1989.

  • Carson Center Writing Fellowship, Rachel Carson Center, Munich, Germany 2019
  • American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship 2016-17
  • Berlin Prize of the American Academy in Berlin Fall 2016
  • Faculty Undergraduate Research Initiative Grant, Northeastern University 2009
  • Fulbright Fellowship (Free University, Berlin) 2004-05
  • Hunt Fellowship, American Council on Germany 2004
  • Faculty Summer Research Grant, Pomona College 2003
  • Wig Teaching Innovation Grant, Pomona College 2002-03
  • Fulbright Fellowship (University of Potsdam) 1996-97
  • Sixties Europe (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming, 2020).
  • “Subculture Berlin,” in Scott Krause, Stefanie Eisenhuth, and Konrad Jarausch eds., Cold War Berlin. Confrontations, Cultures, and Identities (Bloomsbury, forthcoming, 2020).
  • “‘Break the Power of the Manipulators.’ Film in the West German 1968,” in Marco Abel and Christina Gerhardt eds., Celluloid Revolt. 1968 and German Cinema (Camden House, 2019).
  • “1968: Yesterday and Today,” special issue on the 50th anniversary of 1968, The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture, Volume 11, 2018, Issue 2, pp. 227-231.
  • “In Search of Space: The Trope of Escape in German Electronic Music around 1968,” special mini-theme issue on Music and Space, Contemporary European History, Volume 26, Issue 2, May 2017, pp. 339-352.
  • “Culture, Class, and Communism in Sound and Text: The Politics of Rock in the West German 1968,” special issue on the impact of the cultural turn on the left. Twentieth Century Communism, Issue 9, 2015).
  • “1968 in West Germany. The anti-authoritarian Revolt,” The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture. What was Politics in 68? A Special Issue on the West German Sixties. Volume 7, Issue 2, 2014.
  • …with Andrew Lison eds., The Global Sixties in Sound and Vision: Media, Counterculture, Revolt (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).
  • West Germany and the Global Sixties: The Anti-Authoritarian Revolt, 1962-1978 (Cambridge University Press, 2013).
  • “The Sixties in the City: Avant-gardes and Urban Rebels in New York, London, and West Berlin, Journal of Social History, Summer 2013 (46:4).
  • “The SA in the Radical Imagination of the Long Weimar Republic,” Central European History, Volume 46 Number 2 (June 2013).
  • …with Lorena Anton eds., Between the Avantgarde and the Everyday: Subversive Politics in Europe, 1957 to the Present(Berghahn Books, 2011).
  • “A Tale of two Communes: The Private and the Political in Divided Berlin, 1967-1973,” in Martin Klimke, Jacco Pekelder, and Joachim Scharloth eds., Between The Prague Spring and the French May 1968: Transnational Exchange and National Recontextualization of Protest Cultures (Berghahn Books, 2011).
  • “United States of Amnesia? 1968 in the USA,” in Ingo Cornils ed., Memories of ’68 (Peter Lang, 2010).
  • Weimar Radicals: Nazis and Communists between Authenticity and Performance (New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2009).
  • “1968 East and West: Divided Germany as a Case Study in Transnational History,” American Historical Review, Volume 114 (February 2009) AHR forum on the “International 1968.”
  • “Music as a Weapon? Ton Steine Scherben and the Politics of Rock in Cold War Berlin,” German Studies Review 32/1 (February 2009).
  • Education

    PhD, 2000, Modern European History
    University of California at Berkeley

  • Contact

  • Address

    205 ME
    360 Huntington Avenue
    Boston, MA 02115

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