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How the ‘9/11 lawsuit bill’ could reduce American immunity abroad

Image of an American memorial

In a move by Con­gress that assis­tant teaching pro­fessor Dan Urman called “remark­able,” in part because Con­gress rarely agrees on any­thing, the leg­isla­tive branch over­whelming over­rode Pres­i­dent Barack Obama’s veto of the so-​​called 9/​11 law­suit bill.

In a move by Con­gress that assis­tant teaching pro­fessor Dan Urman called “remark­able,” in part because Con­gress rarely agrees on any­thing, the leg­isla­tive branch over­whelming over­rode Pres­i­dent Barack Obama’s veto of the so-called 9/11 law­suit bill.

As a result, U.S. cit­i­zens will now have the power to sue for­eign nations that played a role in ter­rorist attacks resulting in Amer­ican deaths. Urman, director of the minor in Law and Public Policy, explains what the next steps are and how this new law could impact U.S. rela­tions abroad.

Read the Q&A at news@Northeastern. 

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