Skip to content
Apply
Stories

Here’s how Snell library reinvented itself during the COVID-19 pandemic

People in this story

Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University
Students study inside Snell Library.

Students study and attend classes while distanced from each other. They can access more than one million books digitally. And in a recent development, they’ve been able to request hardbound books for delivery, in accordance with public health guidelines. Like so many other mainstays of campus life, the Northeastern Library has adapted to the virtual realities of COVID-19.

“It really is a rapid evolution of the library,” says Dan Cohen, dean of libraries and vice provost for information collaboration at Northeastern. “Every single service that you would get in Snell, pre-COVID, is available to you as a student or faculty member.”

The library, which has been limited to 750 students at a time because of COVID-19 distancing rules—compared to its normal capacity of 2,000 before the pandemic—has become an especially welcome sanctuary this semester.

“I didn’t really go to Snell that much last year—only a handful of times—but now I’ve been going there more because there’s limited space everywhere else,” says Matt Blanco, a second-year student computer science and design. “Everything is really spread out. The space between students is pretty large, so I’ve been feeling safe.”

Continue reading at News@Northeastern.

More Stories

06/13/24 - BOSTON, MA. - Scenes from the Heart of CommUNITY Awards 2024 hosted by Northeastern City and Community Engagement in the EXP building on Thursday, June 14, 2024. Photo by Alyssa Stone/Northeastern University

From tutors to tax assistance, Northeastern’s Heart of CommUNITY awards honor civic leaders and volunteers

06.18.2024
06/13/24 - BOSTON, MA. - Moderator Dr. Régine Jean-Charles, Dean's Professor Culture and Social Justice; Director Africana Studies, leads panelists Deborah Jackson, Northeastern's Reparations Research Team, Ashley Adams, Northeastern's Black Reparations Project, Joseph Feaster, Esq., City of Boston Reparations Task Force, Elizabeth Tiblanc, Embrace Harm Report, and Kyera Singleton, Tufts University's Reparations Research Team, in the discussion

Juneteenth panel at Northeastern examines the past, present and future of the reparations movement in America

06.18.2024

Fake news still has a home on Facebook

06.18.24
All Stories