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Congratulations to the 2020-21 “Disruption and Displacement” Fellows

Please join us in congratulating the 8th annual Northeastern University Humanities Center Resident Fellowship Program. This fellowship provides a focused period of time for fellows to pursue research, to collaborate around a common theme, and to share their work with the Northeastern community. The theme for the 2020-21 academic year is “Disruption and Displacement.”

2020 – 2021 Disruption and Displacement: The Humanities Center invites applications on the theme of disruption and displacement. Displacement, a term in physics that evokes material dislocation, can also refer to political, emotional, and aesthetic disruptions. Literature and art can function as disruptive cultural or political interventions. Aesthetic innovations, such as new genres, and innovations in business may purposely disrupt. Mindful of the current refugee crises, displacements caused by climate change, cultural appropriations and re-appropriations as forms of displacement, and translation as one example of a strategy that might ease the effects of displacement, our goal is to encourage cross-disciplinary conversations that deepen our understanding of disruption and displacement.

Shalanda Baker: “Energy Justice in a World on Fire”
School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
College of Social Sciences and Humanities School of Law

Bilge Erten: “Syrian Refugee Inflows, Infectious Disease Outbreaks, and Vaccination Response in Turkey”
Department of Economics International Affairs Program
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Daniel Faber: “Climate Justice and Migration: The Global Climate Refugee Crisis
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Laura Kuhl: “Narratives of Displacement in Adaptation Funding: Analysis of UN Climate Funds
School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs International Affairs Program
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Elizabeth Maddock Dillon: “The Form of the Novel and the New World: Racial Capitalism, Literature, and Colonialism in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World
Department of English
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Rachel Rosenbloom: “Native-Born: Race, Immigration, and Birthright Citizenship, 1868-2018 School of Law

Heather Streets-Salter: “The Chill Before the Cold War Department of History
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Elicia Cousins – GRADUATE FELLOW: “Reproducing Invisibility: Contested Narratives About Radiation Health Effects After Fukushima”
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

William Bond – GRADUATE FELLOW: “Daemonic Allure: Material Experiences in Nineteenth-Century American Poetry
Department of English
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

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