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Julia Flanders

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Professor of the Practice in English; Director, Digital Scholarship Group

Julia Flanders is a professor of the practice in English and the director of the Digital Scholarship Group in the Northeastern University Library. She also directs the Women Writers Project and serves as editor in chief of Digital Humanities Quarterly, an open-access, peer-reviewed online journal of digital humanities. Her apprenticeship in digital humanities began at the Women Writers Project in the early 1990s and continued with work on the development of digital humanities organizations such as the Text Encoding Initiative and the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations. She has served as chair of the TEI Consortium and as President of the Association for Computers and the Humanities. She has also taught a wide range of workshops on text encoding and served as a consultant and advisor on numerous digital humanities projects. Her research interests focus on data modeling, textual scholarship, humanities data curation, and the politics of digital scholarly work. She is the co-editor, with Neil Fraistat, of The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship, and the co-editor, with Fotis Jannidis, of The Shape of Data in Digital Humanities: Modeling Texts and Text-based Resources (Routledge, 2019).

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  • Marshall Scholarship, 1988-1989, Cambridge University
  • “Learning from the Past: The Women Writers Project and Thirty Years of Humanities Text Encoding,” co- authored with Sarah Connell, Nicole Infanta Keller, Elizabeth Polcha, and William Reed Quinn. Magnificat Cultura i Literatura Medievals 4 (2017).
  • Community-Enhanced Repository for Engaged Scholarship: A case study on supporting digital humanities research,” co-authored with Sarah Sweeney and Abbie Levesque. College and Undergraduate Libraries.
  • “XSLT,” co-authored with Syd Bauman and Sarah Connell. In Doing Digital Humanities: Practice, Training, and Research, ed. Constance Crompton, Ray Siemens, and Richard Lane. Routledge, 2016.
  • “Text Encoding with TEI,” co-authored with Syd Bauman and Sarah Connell. In Doing Digital Humanities: Practice, Training, and Research, ed. Constance Crompton, Ray Siemens, and Richard Lane. Routledge, 2016.
  • “Data Modeling” (with Fotis Jannidis). In A New Companion to Digital Humanities, ed. Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, and John Unsworth. Wiley-Blackwell, 2016.
  • “Rethinking Collections.” In Advancing the Digital Humanities, ed. Katherine Bode and Paul Arthur. Palgrave MacMillan, 2014.
  • Companion to Textual Scholarship (co-editor, with Neil Fraistat). Cambridge University Press, 2013.
  • “TAPAS: Building a TEI Publishing and Repository Service” (with Scott Hamlin). Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative 5, 2013. Online at https://jtei.revues.org/788.
  • “The Literary, the Humanistic, the Digital: Towards a Research Agenda for Digital Literary Studies.“ In Literary Studies in the Digital Age: An Evolving Anthology, ed. Kenneth M. Price and Ray Siemens. MLA, 2013. Online at http://dlsanthology.commons.mla.org/the-literary-the-humanistic-the-digital/.
  • “The Productive Unease of 21st-century Digital Scholarship.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 3.3 (2009). Online at http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/3/000055/000055.html.
  • Rpt. in Defining Digital Humanities: A Reader, ed. Melissa Terras, Julianne Nyhan, and Edward Vanhoutte. Ashgate Publishing, 2013.
  • “Time, Labor, and ‘Alternate Careers’ in Digital Humanities Knowledge Work.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities, ed. Matthew K. Gold. University of Minnesota Press, 2012.
  • “Collaboration and Dissent: Challenges of Collaborative Standards for Digital Humanities.” In Collaborative Research in the Digital Humanities, ed. Marilyn Deegan and Willard McCarty. Ashgate Publishing, 2012.
  • “Electronic Editions: Anthologies.” In Electronic Textual Editing, co-edited by John Unsworth, Lou Burnard and Katherine O’Brien O’Keeffe. Co-sponsored by the Modern Language Association’s Committee on Scholarly Editions and the Text Encoding Initiative Consortium, funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. 2005.
  • “The Body Encoded: Questions of Gender and the Electronic Text.” In Electronic Text: Investigations in Method and Theory, ed. Kathryn Sutherland, Oxford University Press, 1997.

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