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Caitlin Thornbrugh

Image credit: May Pérez

Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor in English

Caitlin F. Thornbrugh is an essayist and poet from Kansas City. Her work has appeared in Parcel Literary Journal, The Paper Napkin, Portel del Sol, and Honest Noise, among others. Her piece, “Ahuacatl, Agovago, Avocado: The Corrupt Alligator Pear” was a 2014 Notable Best American Essay.

Caitlin is passionate and committed to raising awareness of class, race, gender, and environmental injustice. In the classroom and in her writing, she has a strong desire to create change. She teaches community focused writing courses and was named a 2019-2020 GEO Faculty Fellow for her upcoming Dialogue Program: Food and Culture in Vietnam and Cambodia. She also volunteers with a local organization which works to support victims of domestic-violence and bring women closer to nature: the Wilderness Heals-Elizabeth Stone House pledge hike.

During her work at The University of Kansas, she was a founding editorial board member of Beecher’s Literary Magazine. In 2014, she spent a year as an international fellow for Princeton in Asia at The University of Phnom Penh in Cambodia.

Her pedagogical research interests are in working with First-Generation, Undocumented, and Low-Income students. Currently, her writing project is a nonfiction exploration of rivers in Oregon and Kansas City.

  • Writing Residency, The Vermont Studio Center: Nonfiction, August 2018

  • Writing Residency Alumni Grant, The Dickinson House- Belgium, July 2017

  • Writing Residency, The Dickinson House- Belgium, July 2016

  • Notable Essayist in The Best American Essays 2014

  • Lambda Literary Foundation Fellowship for Emerging Writers: Nonfiction, June 2011

  • “Bonville Power Lines” and “Owl Rock Camp.” Yardstick’s Art of Water Anthology (2019)

  • “Eight Minute Walk” and “Industry: A Cycle.” Paper Napkin (2019)

  • “Bodies of Water.” Dorchester Art Project: Installation (2018)

  • “Friends with the Band.” Honest Noise (2017)

  • “Phu Quoc, Vietnam.” Phnom Penh Post: Photographs (2014)

  • “Ahuacatl Agovago Avocado: The Corrupt Alligator Pear.” Parcel Literary Journal (2013)

  • “Beecher’s: A Beginning.” Portel del Sol (2010)

Courses

Course catalog
  • Advanced Writing in the Social Sciences

    ENGW 3308

    Offers instruction in writing for students considering careers or advanced study in the social sciences. By exploring research literature and reflecting on their own experiences, offers students an opportunity to identify issues of interest and analyze how texts make claims, invoke other social science literature, offer evidence, and deploy key terms. Through analysis and imitation, exposes students to the challenges of the social science project, including the collection of data on human subjects and the ethical presentation of evidence. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

  • First-Year Writing

    ENGW 1111

    Designed for students to study and practice writing in a workshop setting. Students read a range of texts in order to describe and evaluate the choices writers make and apply that knowledge to their own writing and explore how writing functions in a range of academic, professional, and public contexts. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to conduct research using primary and secondary sources; how to write for various purposes and audiences in multiple genres and media; and how to give and receive feedback, to revise their work, and to reflect on their growth as writers.

  • First-Year Writing for Multilingual Writing

    ENGW 1102

    Designed for students whose first or strongest language is not English. Students study and practice writing in a workshop setting; read a range of texts in order to describe and evaluate the choices writers make and apply that knowledge to their own writing; explore how writing functions in a variety of academic, professional, and public contexts; and write for various purposes and audiences in multiple genres and media. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to conduct research using primary and secondary sources and to give and receive feedback, to revise their work, and to reflect on their growth as writers.

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