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Melissa Wolter-Gustafson

Part-Time Lecturer in English

Melissa Wolter-Gustafson has taught in a wide variety of educational contexts, ranging from Boston Public elementary and high schools to a Reggio Emilia inspired preschool to a non-profit program committed to expanding access to educational opportunities for underserved middle school students and preparing them to succeed in college. Each of these experiences has contributed to her understanding of how students learn and how to create conditions that foster learning for each student.

2017-2018 CSSH Outstanding Teaching Award

  • Education

    MA, English, Northeastern University

  • Contact

  • Address

    419 Lake Hall
    360 Huntington Ave.
    Boston, MA, 02115

  • Office Hours

    Mondays 12:30-2:00pm, Wednesdays 9:00-10:30am, and by appointment (virtual)

Courses

Course catalog
  • Offers writing instruction for students in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres—such as proposals, recommendation reports, letters, presentations, and e-mails—relevant for careers in business. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

  • Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres—such as literature reviews, case studies, protocols, and care instructions—relevant for careers in nursing, pharmacy, and other health professions. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

  • Offers instruction in writing for students considering careers or advanced study in the physical or life sciences. By exploring research literature and reflecting on their own experiences, offers students an opportunity to identify issues of interest in their field and analyze how scientific texts make claims, invoke other scientific literature, offer evidence, and deploy key terms. Through analysis and imitation, exposes students to the challenges of the scientific project, such as the use of quantitative data and visual presentation of evidence. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

  • First-Year Writing

    ENGW 1111

    Designed for students to study and practice writing in a workshop setting. Students read a range of texts in order to describe and evaluate the choices writers make and apply that knowledge to their own writing and explore how writing functions in a range of academic, professional, and public contexts. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to conduct research using primary and secondary sources; how to write for various purposes and audiences in multiple genres and media; and how to give and receive feedback, to revise their work, and to reflect on their growth as writers.

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