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Nicole Infanta Keller

Part-Time Lecturer in English

Nicole Infanta Keller’s research and teaching interests include women’s scientific writing, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British literature, and digital humanities.

  • Fellow, Jeanne & Dan Valente Center for Arts & Sciences, Bentley University, for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) sponsored Seminar, “A Transdisciplinary Investigation of Evidence and its Use” (2017 – 2018)
  • Northeastern University Dissertation Completion Fellowship (Summer 2018)
  • Cluster Research Grant, The John Carter Brown Library, Brown University, for “Between Words and Worlds: Engravings of Caribs in Colonial Caribbean Print Culture, 1600-1800” (with Elizabeth Polcha, Dania Dwyer, Lara Rose, and David Medina, Summer 2017)
  • Harry Ransom Center Dissertation Research Fellowship, supported by the Creekmore and Adele Fath Charitable Foundation and The University of Texas at Austin Office of Graduate Studies (2016 – 2017)
  • Association for Computers and the Humanities Microgrant for “The Digital Feminist Commons” (with Elizabeth Polcha, 2016 – 2017)
  • Northeastern University Provost’s Dissertation Research Grant (2015 – 2016)
  • [Article] “Learning from the Past: The Women Writers Project and Thirty Years of Humanities Text Encoding,” by Julia Flanders, Sarah Connell, Nicole Infanta Keller, Elizabeth Polcha, and Bill Quinn, Magnificat Cultura i Literatura Medievals 4 (2017): 1-19.
  • [Article] “By the Author of: Performative Publishing and the Major Biographies of Rebecca Harding Davis.” Topic: The Washington and Jefferson College Review 59 (2013): 95-114.
  • [Digital] Contributor to January 2019 update, “Margaret Bryan (entry).” Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to Present. Eds. Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, and Isobel Grundy. Cambridge: Cambridge UP Online, 2006. 01 March 2015.
  • [Book Chapter] “Death and Dying.” Civil War American: A Social and Cultural History of the Era. Eds. Maggie M. Morehouse and Zoe Trodd. New York: Routledge, 2012. 275-283.
  • Education

    PhD, English, Northeastern University

  • Contact

  • Address

    Mail can be sent to:
    405 Lake Hall
    360 Huntington Avenue,
    Boston, MA 02115

  • Office Hours

    (Virtual) Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 9:15am-10:15am, or by Zoom appointment.

Courses

Course catalog
  • Offers writing instruction for students in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres—such as proposals, recommendation reports, letters, presentations, and e-mails—relevant for careers in business. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

  • Offers instruction in writing for students considering careers or advanced study in the physical or life sciences. By exploring research literature and reflecting on their own experiences, offers students an opportunity to identify issues of interest in their field and analyze how scientific texts make claims, invoke other scientific literature, offer evidence, and deploy key terms. Through analysis and imitation, exposes students to the challenges of the scientific project, such as the use of quantitative data and visual presentation of evidence. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

  • Offers writing instruction for students in the College of Engineering and the College of Computer and Information Science. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres—such as technical reports, progress reports, proposals, instructions, presentations, and technical reviews—relevant to technical professions and individual student goals. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

  • First-Year Writing

    ENGW 1111

    Designed for students to study and practice writing in a workshop setting. Students read a range of texts in order to describe and evaluate the choices writers make and apply that knowledge to their own writing and explore how writing functions in a range of academic, professional, and public contexts. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to conduct research using primary and secondary sources; how to write for various purposes and audiences in multiple genres and media; and how to give and receive feedback, to revise their work, and to reflect on their growth as writers.

  • Offers writing instruction for students interested in interdisciplinary study or who wish to explore multiple disciplines. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres relevant to their individual experiences and goals. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and to develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

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